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Full text of "Chestnut Burr, 1927"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/chestnutburr1927kent 




Page one 



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Copyright by 
Robert Fosnight, Editor 




LuciLE Pearce, 

Business Manager 

1927 



Page two 




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Page three 




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FOREWORD 



To record the tremendous 
growth of our college: 

To point to a still greater Kent 
State; 

To present the school year as 
a connecting link between 
our achievements and our 
visions ; and — 

To analyze this year into its 
very numerous activities and 
actors — constitute in brief 
the aims and purposes of 
those who compiled the 
Chestnut Burr of 1927 




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Page four 




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DEDICATION 



TO 

A GREATER KENT STATE, 

That institution of the future, 
which is ever in our minds 
and hearts while we are 
working for the Kent 
State that now is, we 
dedicate The Chest- 
nut Burr of 1927. 



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Page five 



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CONTENTS 



ADIMIXISTRATIOX 

CLASSES 

ACTIVITIES 

ORGANIZATIONS 

COLLEGE LIFE 

ATHLETICS 

HU;\IOR 



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Page six 




THE COLLEGE 



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Page seven 




Poge Eight 




Page nine 




Pile tei 




Page eleven 




Page twelve 




Page thirteen 




Page fourteen 




Page fifteen 




Page sixteen 




ADMINISTRATION 



Page seventeen 



TRUSTEES 



r. 





D. L. Rockwell 



N. W. Senhauser 





W. A. Cluff 



W. M. COURSEN 



Page eighteen 





THE NEW TRAINING SCHOOL 

During the winter of 1925 the Genei'al Assembly of Ohio appropriated Three 
Hundred Fifty Thousand Dollars for a teacher-training building for Kent State Normal 
College. By resolution of the Board of Trustees of the College, the building' was 
named "The William A. Cluff Teacher-Training Building." This action was taken 
partly in consequence of Mr. Cluff's help in presenting to the Legislature the needs 
of the College and partly because of his genuine friendliness for the Training 
School. 

The new building will probably be finished some time during the month of May 
and will be ready for occupancy in time for the summer quarter which opens June 
20, 1927. It will house all of the departments of the training school, viz. the kinder- 
garten, the elementary school, the junior high school, and the senior high school. 
The building is 275 feet long and 65 feet wide except in the central section which is 
wider. In addition to the basement or ground floor, there are two other complete 
floors and a third one over the central part of the building. Most of the ground 
floor is higher than the grade line next to the building. 

On the ground floor will be found the kindergarten rooms, the home economics 
department, the manual arts, locker rooms, showers and store rooms. The floor of the 
small gymnasium extends several feet below the ground floor level and thus aff'ords 
sufficient height for basket-ball. 

The first floor proper has the assembly room, one college recitation room, the 
offices, and class rooms to accommodate the entire elementary school. The next 
floor will be given over to the junior and senior high schools with the junior high 
school on the south end and the senior high school on the north. The senior high 
school study room is in the central part of the building. Special music and art 
rooms are on this floor in the extreme north end. The top floor over the central 
part of the building has rooms for physics, chemistry, and biology. 

In the elementary and junior high school department each critic teacher is to 
have two rooms so that if necessary she may divide her grade and supervise the 
work of two student-teachers at the same time. 



Page nineteen 




David Allen Anderson, A. B., "SI. A., Ph. D. 
President 



Page twenty 



OUR GRADUATES AS TEACHERS 

We Americans believe in education. Our faith in it is unquestioning. We be- 
lieve in schools. We believe in schools because we regard them as the strongest safe- 
guard of society, as the best means of developing individual personality, as the surest 
way of enlightening the entire human race; and we are certain that in them are 
laid the soundest foundations for national stability. 

The prime factor contributing to the effectiveness of these schools is the teacher. 
It is generally agreed that the teacher constitutes the heart and soul of the school. 
To supply schools with adequately trained teachers is looked upon by many as the 
largest field of professional service in America. 

Teachers colleges have been developed as specialized institutions for the express 
purpose of training teachers. Kent State College is classed among the worthy mem- 
bers of this group of professional schools. It has been and it continues to be the aim 
at Kent to maintain a faculty which shall be the life giver — the soul of the institution. 
This group of teachers must transmit to the teachers-to-be the ideals, knowledge and 
skills which they in turn will use in directing the children and adolescents to a realiza- 
tion of their greatest possibilities. 

Kent State recognizes in the candidates for graduation in the classes of 1927 
many of the native and acquired qualities that make for success. Among these 
qualities your Alma Mater prizes especially worthy character which gives security 
in every walk of life; scholarship or wealth of knowledge which is the first essential 
in teaching; faith in education, in young life, in humanity, and in the teaching pro- 
fession; vision that looks beyond the day's routine into the inclusive life of society; 
fine idealism; and self-control. 

These are the qualities that have enabled Kent's alumni to achieve success and to 
gain recognition among the leaders in their chosen field. These same qualities will 
enable the graduates of succeeding years to become noble men and women — teachers 
capable of transforming American youth into a better citizenship. 

David Allen Anderson 



Page tiventy-one 



ADVISOR TO MEN 




Being creatures of habit we are always the 
victims of customary procedure. Because the 
early schools were so organized that military 
discipline was necessary to guarantee existence, 
we find ourselves still thinking of administratioii 
in terms of reward and punishment. So it is that 
too often the student thinks of the advisor as 
one especially designated to do the scolding and 
punishing. 

At Kent State we are organized with the 
thought of making the Advisor to Men as help- 
ing friend. We believe that successful admin- 
istration must be based upon a desire to give 
guidance and suggestion and carried out through 
democratic cooperation between faculty and 
students. 

The oflice of Advisor to Men gives a varied 
service including — 

1. An attempt to provide better rooms and 
better rooming conditions. 

2. An effort to arrange part time employment. 
Advice to students concerning programs. 
The giving of encouragement and inspiration to those students who have not 

adapted themselves to new conditions. 
Supervison of the social life of men students. 

The giving of aid to fraternal and other student organizations in the conduct of 
their affairs. 

It is the hope of those directing the affairs of the college that the growth in 
service rendered may keep pace with the growth of the institution and that the 
idealism of the typical Kent man may be such as to set him apart as a leader in any 
community. 



Raymond Manchestek 



I'nge tivenly-iivo 




Blanche A. Verder 



DEAN OF WOMEN 

OUR COLLEGE DAYS 

John Ruskin once said: "There are few 
things more wonderful to me, than that old 
people never tell young ones how precious their 
youth is. They — scarcely ever warn or watch 
them. Remember, then, that I at least have 
warned you (young men and young women) 
that the happiness of life, and its power — de- 
pend on the way you pass your days now. 
They are not to be sad days, far from that, for 
the first duty of young people is to be delighted 
and delightful; but they are to be in the deepest 
sense solemn days." 

During no four years of your life can Ruskin's 
words be more applicable than during your 
college years. They are not to be sad years, 
but years full of joy — because they should be 
full of all good things. 

First, you should be enjoying robust health. 
We watch and warn, for >\'e do not want you to 
learn to prize your health through the sad experience of losing it. Youth and health 
are precious. 

Secondly, you should rejoice in mental growth. There should be joy and zest in 
intellectual attainment. You should know the thrill that comes from performing 
perfectly the mental tasks set for you in college. Particularly should you rejoice in 
the hard thinking out of a problem to its logical conclusion. 

Thirdly, you should rejoice because these college years are afforded you for 
spiritual growth. This does not mean that college will prove to be a storehouse of 
spiritual manna, though it should be that far more than it is. But for the normally 
developing soul, college years should be a period when spiritual problems are squarely 
met, and when insight and faith are developed. We warn, and watch, and hope. 

Have you ever heard a better answer to the question, "Why go to college than 
this, — "We go to college to learn how to live with others." College years, therefore, 
should be full of the joy of social contacts. Perhaps of all the subjects offered in any 
college, the one not listed in any curriculum is most fruitful in our lives — the study 
of human nature. Alumni generally seem to prize most highly, and to find most en- 
during, the blessings offered during undergraduate days of acquaintanceship and 
friendship. If there is any other more valued asset taken out of college halls, it is 
the ability to know how to attack a problem. And here again, we of the faculty 
stand by, and with Ruskin, "watch and warn." 

Happy are they who arrive at the end of their college course with no regrets, 
and who leave college better than they entered it. And happy is their Alma Mater, 
for she gives them her blessing with a sense of confidence in their ability and in 
their spirit to solve even greater problems beyond her fair campus. 



Page twenty -three 




DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

L. S. IviNS, Ph. B., M.S., M. A. 

The school laws of Ohio require that agriculture 
be taught in high schools and elementary schools; 
that elementary teachers who are examined by 
county superintendents, must take the examination 
in agriculture in order to teach; and that Kent Col- 
lege must maintain an adequate department for the 
training of teachers of Agriculture for the schools 
of the state. Because of these laws Kent State since 
it first opened its doors has maintained a Depart- 
ment of Agriculture for the complete and proper 
instruction of prospective teachers and other stu- 
dents who desire a broad and cultural education. 



DEPARTMENT OF ART 

Nina S. Humphrey 

"The term 'drawing' applies to only a small part 
of the instruction and education in the realm of 
art that is designed to teach children to appreciate 
the beauty of truth; to catch the message from 
nature and from human life; to rightly interpret 
it and to express it in such a way as to give the 
message and the joy which accompany it to others. 
This is the mission of art." 





DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 
Ethel Gowans, B. S., A. M. 

The scope of biology is unmeasurable and its prob- 
lem endless, but it aims to teach its laws in such a 
way that one may understand the meaning of what 
has gone before; that he may live a longer, fuller 
and more purposeful life; that he may vision a 
brighter and better future because the history of 
the past has shown that change is slowly but pro- 
gressively towards greater perfection and beauty; 
and that man is not the reason for the existence of 
all earthly things, but that he is greatly honored 
by being one with all about him. 

(Prepared by Eva N. Spencer, student of the 
Biology Department.) 



Page twenty-four 



THE DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 

Louis A. Bu Damn, M.A. 

This is the newest departmental addition to the 
college. It was opened in January, 1925 with two 
instructors and an approximate enrollment of 60 
students. It now has three instructors in whose 
classes there are enrolled a total of one hundred 
and sixty students. Its primary aim is to prepare 
teachers of commercial subjects in high school but 
it also offers excellent opportunity to those students 
who wish training for commercial or secretarial 
positions, or to those who may desire a wider range 
of electives in their college work. If given the 
proper amount of publicity and provided with 
additional equipment it liids fair to become one of 
the major departments of the college. 





DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

Daniel W. Pearce, B. S., A. B., A. M., Acting 

Head of Department 
A department of Education in a Teachers' Col- 
lege should be the center about which all the 
facilities of the academic departments and The 
School of Directed Observation and Teaching are 
organized. That is to say the Department of Educa- 
tion should function as a co-ordinator and as an ever 
willing helper in all efforts directed towards realiz- 
ing as fully as may be the objective of such an in- 
stitution, namely artistic teachers. 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

Edgar Packard, A. B. 

Study English. It is the world's foremost lan- 
guage. It is the material by which vague subcon- 
sciousness takes on form in the most practical, the 
most philanthropic, and the most inspiring thoughts 
now being produced. It is the means of self-ex- 
pression by which the one-fifth of the race now- 
using it is enabled to publish four-fifths of all books 
and periodicals. And it is the medium of communi- 
cation which all the signaling at sea and nine- 
tenths of all the cablegrams and telegrams employ. 
Study English! 




Page twenty-five 



v^ 




DEPARTMENT OF FRENCH 
Miss Rowlan, A. M. 

The aim of this department is to oflfer an oppor- 
tunity of mastering French for its own sake. Here 
is a chance to lengthen your vision, to open the doors 
of the unknown. By much reading from many 
authors you will be able to follow the thoughts of 
the masterminds of another great civilization. So 
you may form contacts with source material, and 
advance to research work in history, literature, and 
science as well as add to the pleasure found in 
music, art and travel. 

A key to a fuller life. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY 
AND GEOLOGY 

David Olson, M. Sc, A. B. 

In earlier times a man's area of relationships 
extended but little beyond his visual horizon. To- 
day it is Earth encompassing. We depend on and 
contribute to all parts. In this enterprise we have 
girdled the earth with rails and wires. We have 
taken to waters and the air and indeed to the uni- 
versal ether. We are straightening rivers, levelling 
mountains, extending shorelines, deepening bays 
and exploring the air. We fly over the plains and 
waters and have gone far in conquering physical 
force. Peace and good will depend on our under- 
standing this new and wider sphere of interrela- 
tions. Here lies the field of geography. 





DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND SOCIAL 

SCIENCE 

H. D. Byrne, M. A., A.B. 

Every intelligent individual desires to know in 
somewhat of detail the story of the long journey 
of mankind down through the millenniums of time. 
The History Department offers four years of stand- 
ard college history, in addition to certain methods 
and special courses. This Department is also devel- 
oping the Social Science studies in the field of 
Economics, Sociology and Government. New courses 
have been developed constantly to take care of the 
increased demand until it is now possible for the 
student to secure four years of work in these com- 
bined fields. Further additions are planned in these 
subjects for the ensuing year. 



Page twenty-six 



DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Bertha Louise Nixson, B. S. 

"No Nation is any better than its homes." 
When we consider that the fifty per cent of 
children who never enter high school do establish 
homes and found families that must be maintained 
on the low wage scale, we realize the need of 
stressing home-making in the elementary and sec- 
ondary schools of our land. The importance of 
applying the principles of home economics in the 
lives of individuals necessitates its being taught in 
correlation with all other subjects. The home i.s 
the nuclevis from which springs the physical, mental, 
social, and spiritual life. 





DEPARTMENT OF KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY 
Hazel Swan, B. S. 

The Kindergarten-Primary Department was or- 
ganized in September with Miss Herman in charge 
of the work with the kindergarten children, and 
with Miss Swan in charge of Teacher-training. 

The children attend in two sections, a morning 
and an afternoon session. Seventy have been reg- 
istered. 

The department is otfering five courses in Teacher- 
training at present. Recommendations have re- 
cently been made for a four year curriculum grant- 
ing Bachelor of Science Degree and Certificate for 
teaching in Kindergarten and grades one, two and 
three. 



THE LIBRARY 

Margaret Dunbar, B. L., B. L. S. 

A library is the scholar's workshop; it is the 
teacher's assistant; it is the professional man's 
outfit. To the true book lover it is much more: 
it is a paradise of delights wherein are contained 
those things that inform the mind, stimulate the 
understanding, cultivate the heart, and uplift the 
soul. 

James Baldwin 




Page twenty-seven 




DEPARTMENT OP MATHEMATICS 

Raymond Manchester, A. M., A. B. 

An ancient philosopher, when asked what studies 
a youth should pursue, replied : "Mathematics and 
music — the one that he may know God, the other 
that he may enjoy man." Centuries have turned 
around the clock of time but we still study mathe- 
matics to discover truth and music to provide en- 
tertainment and inspiration. So, when you are 
weary of studying opinion and surmise, come to 
room 315 for a study of the true laws governing 
man and his universe. 



DEPARTMENT OF MANUAL TRAINING 
Clinton Van Deusen, M. E. 

Thorndike names three forms of intelligence : 
general, social, and mechanical. The aim of this 
department is to develop the last of these three and 
to develop elements of skill that may be of service 
later in the learning process or as a foundation for 
later vocational work. 

This form of intelligence and skills can best be 
developed thru actual experience in handwork. 
Manual training is handwork given in schools for 
this purpose. 

Much of this work may well be given in the ele- 
mentary school by the regular grade room teacher. 
It is for this reason that those preparing to be 
grade room teachers should take manual training. 





DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 
Grace King, A. M. 

The aim of music is to provide us with a wise 
use of our leisure hours, resulting in the love and 
desire for good music. 

Shakespeare has said : "The man that hath no 
music in himself and is not moved by sweet sounds, 
is fit for treasons, stratagem and spoils. Let no 
such man be trusted." 



Fags tivcnty-eight 




G. To coach 
DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL SCIENCES 
C. F. RuMOLD, A. B., LL. B. 

The Department of Physical Sciences offers 
courses in Chemistry and Physics which are the 
equivalent of similar courses in Colleges and Uni- 
versities. Full credit has always been given every- 
where and for every purpose for the work done at 
Kent State in these courses. 

Ninety-six term hours of Chemistry and twenty- 
four term hours of Physics are available. General 
Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, 
Qualitative Analysis and Food and Nutrition Chem- 
istry are offered in consecutive courses. Freshman 
College Physics, Radio and Methods of teaching 
Science ai-e offered in the Physics courses. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
A. O. De Weese, B. S., M. D. 

The purpose of the Physical Education course is 
to prepare men and women to discharge the duties 
of a director of a School of Health as follows: 

1. To give pupils their physical examinations. 

2. To have charge of the health education of 
pupils. 

3. To advise concerning the heating, lighting, 
and the ventilation and sanitation of the school 
building. 

4. To direct playground activities. 

5. To have charge of such special classes as 
open air classes. 

supervise athletics and games. 





REGISTRAR 
Lawrence Miller, A. M., B. S. 

The Registrar's office is no longer considered 
merely as a place where records are kept. Rather 
it is now thought of as the place where the officers 
and faculty of the college can go for information 
in regard to many problems. It is rapidly becom- 
ing a research office investigating problems of 
personnel administration. 



KP]NT STATE TRAINING SCHOOL 
Emmet Stophek, A. B. 
Kent State Training School with its 450 pupils 
is extensively used for observation and research 
purposes by the Department of Education and by 
the various special methods classes of the college. 
It furnishes opportunities for student teaching in 
the kindergarten, the elementary school, and in the 
junior and senior high schools. Faculties for prac- 
tice teaching include not only the usual academic 
subjects, but also music, art, home economics, man- 
ual training, commercial subjects, and physical 
education. 




Page twenty-nine 




Stephen A. Harbourt, B. S., M. A. 
Extension and Agriculture 



Doris Cauffield, B. S. 
Home Economics: 



Thomas E. Davey, Jr., A. B. 
Eiiglii^h 



Raymond M. Clark, B. S., M. A. 
Education 



Fren Musselman, B. S., M. A. 
Extension and Education 



Mona Fletcher, B. S., M. A. 
History and Social Science 



John T. Johnson, A. B. 

Agticulture, Photography and 
Farm Sxperintendoit 



Mrs. Eloise Irwin, A. B. 
Physical Education 



George A. Damann, B. S. 
Manual Training 



Page thirty 



Margaret Basinger 
Alt 



Eleanor Ann Meyer, Ph. B., M. A. 
History 



Philip E. Baird, B. S. 
Commerce 



Marie Hyde Apple 

Physical Education 



Marian E. Mills, A. M. 
Biology 



Chester E. Satterfield, A. B.. B. S. 
English 



Frank L. Oktavec, B. S., M. A. 
Physical Education 



Merle E. Wagoner, B. S. 
Coach and AgriciiUure 



Isabelle R. Oktavec, B. S. 
Physical Education 




Page thirty-one 




Ilo Maddux, A. B., M. A. 

Supervisor of Student Teaching 



May H. Prentice 
Supervisor of Practice Teaching 



Edith M. Olson, B. S. 

Junior Hig)i School Ptincipal 



ISABELLE HaZEN, A. B., M. A. 
High School Critic 



Amy Irene Herripf, B. S., M. A. 
High School Critic 



Vera Morris, B. S. 
Home Economics 



Isabelle Dunbar 

Assistant Librarian 



Margaret Jeffrey 
First Grade Critic 



Maude L. Van Antwerp, M. A. 
Junio)' Higli School Critic 



Page thirty-two 



Ruth M. Parrish 

Firxf Gradr Critic 



Ada Hyatt, B. S. 

Till id Grade Critic 



Ora Belle Bachman, B. M. 
Mtisic 



Marcaret Scanlan 
Art 



Laura Hill, B. S. 

Sixth Grade Critic 



Bertha A. Lively, B. S., M. A. 
Fifth Grade Critic 



Nellie Berman, M. A. 
Kindogartim Critic 



Neda Freeman, A. B., M. A. 
FoiDth Grade Critic 



L. Ethel Spray, A. B. 
Second Grade Critic 




^ 



Page thirty-three 




Iaeel Thurston 

Libiaiiaii Cataloguer 



LiDA Mae Straight 

Secretary to Traiuiny School Supt. 



Muriel Line 

Full time Student Librarian 



Adaline O. King 

Assistant Treasurer 



Lola Merydith 

Secretary to Business Manager 



Helen F. Bonsall 

Secretary to the President 



Marian Wolcott 

Assistant to Business Manager 



John B. Gillespie, Jr. 
Business Manager 



Ruth R. Keith 

A ssistd n t Reg ist}-a r 



Page thirty-four 




M. Lois Trefethen, A. B. 
Dietitian 



Alex Whyte 

Plant Superintendent 



noNNA McBride 

Seoetcifij to Assistant Treasurer 



MiTTiE Smith, R. N. 
Niiri:e 



Frank N. Harsh, E. S. 

F)incip(it Se)iior High School 



Mrs. Grace E. Bu Dahn, B. S. 
Co in Die )-cial Department 



Mrs. Edith Coe White 

Head Resident, Moulton Hall 



Page thirty-five 



KEN ^ STATE 

Kent State College is set on a hill, — 
To win to her door you must climb with a will, 
And Kent State Hill is weariful long, — 
Hut we trudge on together, a glad-hearted throng 
Climbing the hill at Kent. 

Kent State portal is open wide; 
You've made the grade and you're safe inside;- 
There's a clarion call to maiden and youth, 
For now is the time you begin, in truth. 
Climbing the hill at Kent. 

For, hills of the earth or hills of the soul. 
It is all the same, for they take their toll, 
One of the body and one of the mind, 
And the summit is hard to gain, we find. 
Climbing the hill at Kent. 

But keep a-stepping, and first you know. 
You are up on top where the cool winds blow, 
Below, farstretched, lies a wonderful view 
And glad are the eyes and the heart of you 
That vou climbed the hill at Kent. 



Page thirty-six 




CLASSES 

DEGREE SENIORS 



Page thirty-seven 




Degree Senior Class Officers. 

President, Cletus Scheetz. Vice-President, Helen Blake 

Class Adviser, Lester S. Ivins 

Secretary, Gertrude Besaw ' Treasurer, j\Iarion King 



Page thirty-eight 




Gertrude Besaw, Kent, Ohio 

Graduate of Oberlin Conservatory 

of Music 
Sigma Sigma Sigma 
Glee Club 



Claude E. Burgett, Jefferson, Ohio 
Delta Phi Sigma, 4 
Orchestra, 4 



Helen Blake, Kent, Ohio 

President of Off Campus 

Women's Club, 2 

President of Sigma Sigma Sigma, 4 

Athletic Board, S 

Associate Editor of Chestnut Burr, 4 

General of Musketeers, 3 

Physical Education Club, 4 

Pan-Hellenic, 3-4 

Social Science, 4 
E. Eugene Arnold, Quaker City, Ohio 



Page thirty-nine 




Leokah Dreher, Defiance, Ohio 
Defiance College 
Off Campus Club 
Social Science Club 

Eugene Feeley, Rye, Nev/ York 
Captain Varsity Football, '25 
Captain of Varsity Basketball, '26 
President of Kappa Mu Kappa, '26 
President of Varsity "K", '27 
Social Science Club, '27 
President College Sophomore Class, '25 



Mrs. Francis Carr, Kent, Ohio 

Social Science Club, 4 

Off Campus Women's Club, 1-2-4 

Women's League, 1-2-3-4 
Benjamin R. Colville, St. Louisville, Ohio 

Varsity "K", 4 

Kappa Mu Kappa, 2-.3-4 

President Kappa Mu Kappa, 4 



Page forty 




Madeline Halstead (Hiram College, 

Musketeer, 4 
Glee Club, 4 



Ross Gandee, Ravenna, 
Varsity K 
Ohio University 



Ohio 



Dorothea Harris, Social Science, 4 

Delta Sig, 3-4 

Glee Club, 3-4 

Kent Stater Staff, 4 

Buccaneer, 3-4 

Pan-Hellenic, 3-4 

Mathematics Club, 3 
Robert M. Fosnight, Akron, Ohio 

Editor of Annual, '27 

Akron University 

Oberlin College 

Graduate School-University of Chicago 
'27 



Page forty-one 




Hazel Keener 

President Alpha Sigma Al^jha, 3-4 
Trebel Cleff, 3-4 



C. HuLME, Warren, 
Y. M. C. A., 3 
Kent Stater Staff, 
Annual Staflf, 3-4 



Ohio 



Ferne Strawn Gerren 

Morningside College, 

Sioux City, Iowa, 1-2 

Tri Sigma, 3-4 

Off Campus Club, 4 

President Lowry Hall, 3 
Francis Jacob, Kent, Ohio 

Advertising Manager, Annual, 

Ohio Wesleyan, 1-2 

Tennis, 3 



Page forty-two 




H. Kloha 

Social Science, 4 
Y. W. C. A., 3 

Earl McPeek, Kent, Ohio 



JIarian King 

Treas. Senior Degree '27 

Off Campus '23-27 Charter Member 

Social Science, 3-4 
Harold Miller, Aurora, Ohio 

A. B. Hiram College 



Page forty-three 




Mrs. Alice Murlin 
Jason C. Murlin, Kent, Ohio 

Blue and Gold Debating Club, 

Men's Glee Club, 1-3-4 

Gamma Tau Delta, 4 

Y. M. C. A., 3 

Orchestra, 3 

Treasurer El. Jr. Class, '21 



Glbnna Overholt 

Off Campus, 1-2-3-4 
Social Science, 3 
Musketeer, 4 



Oren Casey, Lorain, Ohio 
Gamma Tau Delta 



Page fortij-fatu 




IjUCIle Pearce, Kent, Ohio 

Ball's Teachers College, Miincie, 

Indiana 
Treble Clef Club, 2-3 
Off Campus Women's Club, 2-3-4 
Y. W. C. A. President, 3-4 
Woman's League Cabinet, 2 
Sigma Sigma Sigma, 3-4 
Business Manager, Chestnut Burr, 4 

Ralph Rhodes, Kent, Ohio 
Social Science Club 
University of Montana, 2-3 



I.uciLE Patterson 

Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 

New York University, New York City 



August Peterka, Hudson, Ohio 
President Junior Class, '26 
Glee Club, 3 
Captain Football, '25 
Kappa Mu Kappa, 2-3-4 
Varsity "K", 1-2-3-4 



Page forty-five 







Ada Ross 

Cleveland School of Education, 2 
years 

Baldwin Wallace, 1 year 

Social Science, 3-4 

Woman's League, 4 
Cletus Scheetz, Fresno, Ohio 

College Editor, Chestnut Burr, '27 

Executive Committee Social Science 
Club, '27 



Verna Proehl, Ravenna, Ohio 
Oft' Campus Women's Club 



N R. ScHOFiELD, Chesterhill, Ohio 

B. S. Degree in Agriculture at Ohio 

State University, '23 
Social Science Club 



Page forty-six 




Eva N. Spencer, Ravenna, Ohio 
Assistant Biology Department 



Delton R. Smith, Cleveland, Ohio 
Tennis, 3 
Varsitv "K" 



Eunice S. Reudi, Ravenna, Ohio 

New York State Normal, 2 years 

Off Campus, 4 

Social Science, 4 

Debating, 4 
Virgil L. Shilling, Cortland, Ohio 

Ohio Northern University of law, '23 

Delta Phi Sigma 

Glee Club, '26 

Searchlight Staff, '26 



Page forty-seven 




Alice Young 

University of Minnesota, 2 years 

Alpha Sigma, 3-4 

Kentonian Editor, '20 

Literary Editor, Chestnut Burr, '27 

Sec. Pan-Hellenic Council, '27 
H. Julius Williamson, Cuyahoga Falls, 
Ohio 

Hiram College, 1-2-3 

Varsity "K", 4 



Genevieve Wright 

Assistant Home Economics Dept. 
Sigma Sigma Sigma, 4 



Bray Toot, Dellroy, Ohio 



Walter R. Youngen, Rogersville, Ohio 
Delta Phi Sigma 



Puye forty-eight 




DIPLOMA SENIORS 



Page forty-nii; 




Dll'LOMA SeNIOI! ClASS OFFICERS 

President, Esther Veiiner Vice-President, Ruth Sweeny 

Secretary, Laura Wood Treasurer, Gloria Wright 

Class Adviser, L. A. Bu Dahn 



Page fifty 



Jeanette Carnes 



Phyllis Consol 



Sophia Brown 



Gertrude Delanty 



Mildred Moore 



Helen Donner 



Lorena Beeler 



Ottilia Szeghy 



Agnes Black 



Willima Cassell 



Marjorie Blalock 



Gladys Hitchings 




Page fifty-one 




Helen Murray 



Tina Johola 



Hilda Ramsay 



Georgiana Reed 



Martha Borklund 



Norma Hurlbut 



Evelyn Williams 



Eda Boelenbacher 



Mable Straus 



Viola Clark 



Margaret Floyd 



Lois Billeteh 



Page fiftij-tivo 



:}<!i^l>\. 



Helen Hamilton 



Nettie Smith 



Jane Gibson 



Nellie Lee 



Josephine Ensign 



Helen Lane 



AuRiLLA Lyon 



Ethel Summers 



Mary Dickson 



Sydonah Buckley 



Beatrice Giber 




Page fifty-three 




Nellie Walker 



Gertrude Hathaway 



Florence Keyser 



Gladys Forsythe 



Gertrude Simons 



Agnes O'Horo 



Blanche Jones 



Gladys Tarr 



Helen Murphy 



Edith Heard 



Doris Smith 



Pearl McFarren 



Page fiftij-four 



Eleanor O'Malley 



Vera Mac Heddleston 



Magdaline Erb 



Rhea George 
Hattie Reed 
Rose Rifkin 

Maxine Billiar 
Jean Gorham 
Harriet Myers 

Laura Wood 
Alice Wire 




Pciffe fifty-five 




Irma Bate 



Irta Martikinen 



Philomena Zappolo 



Olive Walter 



Elinor Bryenton 



Minnie Carpalleti 



Mary Sanderson 



Mary Claire Brown 



Gladys Brunn 



Majorie Rearoth 



Ellen Collins 



Florence Tinney' 



Page fifty-six 



Mildred Francis 



Helen McGarvey 



Marion Fisher 



Helen Woodruff 



Mildred Stauder 



Anne Hakundy 



Jeanette Carnes 



Pearl Phillips 



Blanche Jones 



Ellen Collins 



Mildred Brodbeck 



Clara Ohlemacher 




Page fifty-seven 




Dixie Wales 



Lois Kestle 



Majorie Patterson 



Rose Wexler 



Janice Clapp 



Grace Davidow 



Helen Crooks 



Helen Sperry 



Margaret Hull 



Merle F idler 



Evelyn Anthony 



Eleanor Bryenton 



Page fifty-eight 



Antoinette Scaletta 



Mable Wright 



LEONA V. SCHEETZ 



Thelma Hamilton 



Abe Schwartz 



Elsie Stroup 



Eileen Huelsman 



Ruth Lewis 



Ruth Mandereach 



Helen German 



Leila Riley 



Dorothy Hall 




Page fifty-nine 




Marion Leri 



Esther Venner 



Katherine Lado 



Lillian Matlas 



Margaret Hayes 



Hester Thomas 



Max Robinowitz 



Helen Van Winkle 



T HELM A ANKRIM 



Ida Hershkovitz 



Betty Feldman 



Thelma Davis 



Page sixty 




DEGREE JUNIORS 



Pac/e sixty-one 




Degree Junior Class Officers 

President, Ward Davis Vice-President, Agnes Watson 

Secretary, Beatrice Johnstone Treasurer, Anna Wells 



Pauc sixty-two 



^.J^^i^•S^ 



Jessie Preston 



Avis Copeland 



Anna McKim 



Chester Davis 



Francis Mull 



Hilda Bachman 



Jennie Schroyer 



Anna Brown 



Beatrice Johnstone 



Ralph Rogers 




Page sixty-three 




Grace Russell 



Gwendolyn Drew 



Christine Steinmetz 



Roy Merrill 



Mary Leasure 



Donald Menough 



Howard Keener 



Evelyn Long 



Dorothy Grimm 



Henrietta Strayer 



Paye sixty-four 



Bernice Van Hyning 



Roger Thomas 



Charles Wells 



Agnes Watson 



Ruth Swinehart 



Seldon H. Watkins 



Kenneth Cook 



Kathleen Fisher 



Maud Thomas 



Frank Hall 




Page sixty-five 




Merna Elliman 



ESTELLA ESTERLY 



Florence Grant 



Clarence Chenevey 



Antoinette Link 



Evelyn Horton 



Virginia Webber 



Karl W. Sander 



Ada Schmitt 



Lillian J. Rice 



Page sixty-six 



Clarence Gerren 



Mildred Miller 



Anna Wells 



Elizabeth Boyd 



Helen Monegan 



JIax R. King 



Ann Brown 



Ruth Wilson 



Pauline Gaston 



Harold Dunlavy 




Page sixty-seven 




Russell Woolman 



Hazel Cook 



Byron Leeper 



Jack Chernin 



J. C. Henry 



Harley B. Eldridge 



Page sixty-eight 




DEGREE SOPHOMORES 



Page sixty -nine 






k 



k 




Degree Sophomore Class Officers 
President, Earl Weikel Vice-President, Elizabeth Trescott 

Secretary, Edith Tripcony Treasurer, Frank Curtiss 



Paye seventy 



Roy Johnson 



Marian Morseach 



Ray Beulah 



Lucy Stabler 



Ward W. Davis 



Karl W. Muster 



Roy Ober 



Edith Tripcony 



Marion Weisneiwski 



Leslie Downes 



Charles Randolph 



Helen Seidel 



Evalena Clinger 
Ann Moore 



Agnes Hennon 




Page seventy-one 




Robert Hall 

Ethel Frishnet 

Lucille Ewing 
Alice Elgin 

Joseph Henley 

Laura Fleming 
Wayne Pomfrey 

Edith Grove 

Margaret Taylor 
Henrietta Beechy 

Clyde Weasner 

Marion Laird 
Harold Polen 

Florence Crosby 

Verb Beck 



Page seventy-trvo 



Margaret Hoffman 

Sherman Crow 

Merle Murphy 

Doris Scroogie 

Kenneth Nash 

Frank Curtis 

Edna Tarr 

Carl Henderson 



Irma Youngen 



Edward Harris 



Jessie Bradshaw 



Earl Weikel 



Kathryn Thomas 




Page seventy-three 




LiLA Ellsworth 



Mary Brenneman 



Archie Davis 



Ralph Spangler 



Claude Geaber 



Naomi Johnson 



Elizabeth Truscott 
Albert Heritage 



Merrell Fuller 



ViLURA Camp 



Ronald Spacht 



Agnes Quinlan 



Jane Mason 



Esther Kirkbride 



Osborne Abbey 



Page seventy-four 



^' 




DEGREE FRESHMEN 



Page seventy-five 







Degree Freshman Class Officers 



President, Lewis Hall 
Secretary, Idabell Harris 



Vice-President, Helen Gilcrest 

Treasurer, Frank Webb 



Page seventy-six 



Alene Muter 



Lewis Hall 



Josephine Lytle 



Frank Hanna 



Anna Hawley 



Robert Bohecker 



Mary Priddy 



Helen Gilcrest 
Grace Barker 



Elizabeth Hamilton 



Ruby Dort 



Louise Hencky 



Marie Beadle 



Helen Snowden 
Linnie Beadle 




Page seventy -seven 




Amy Rideout 



Lucille Hendricks 



Helen Lauser 



Alfred Hill 



Virginia Bundy 



Robert Kelso 



Mildred NiHauser 



Esther Scheetz 

Evelyn Kneifel 



Eleanor Rowney 

Orris Curie 

Mary Cook 

Fidelia Farnum 

Gertrude Weiss 

Elmer Geib 



Page seventy-eight 






Claude Vair 



Dorothy Weirick 



Esther Gee 



Lois Fenn 



George Flood 



Ruth Williams 



Edith Richardson 



IsABELLE Walsh 
Idabelle Harris 



Betty Francis 



Frank Webb 
Margaret Kay 



Gertrude Kruger 



Dorothy Babb 



Margaret Malamphy 




Page seventy-nine 




Mr. Strawman 

Treva Hartman 



Mary McGilvery 



Katherine Ross 

Eunice Smith 



Dan Stratton 



Mr. Hibeard 



Florence Johnson 



Dorothy Bickel 



Ruth Ransome 

Eva Evans 



Duane Stambaugh 



Marion Witroski 



Maurice McKay 



Helen Eastwood 



Page eight}! 



William Tabler 



Mary Duer 



Wilbur Smith 



Dorothy Watenbaugh 



Fred Drew 



Blanche Russell 



Howard Stambaugh 
Velma Leeper 



Dorothy Stabler 



Happy Sapp 



Emma Alman 



Charles E. Fish Jr. 



J. Harold Byler 




Page eighty-one 




Sofia Weltman 



Vera Hohman 



Edith Whittacre 



Gloria Wright 



Margurite Fisher 



Ruth Sweeny 



Clarice Thompson 



Anna Hawley 



Lois Canfield 



Margaret Grimm 



Helene Luce 



Mrs. Brockett 



fage eighty-two 




DIPLOMA JUNIORS 



Page eighty-three 



/;'*■) 




Diploma Junior Class Officers 
President, Esther Gee Vice-President, Dorothy Powell 



Secretary, Ruth Glass 



Treasurer, Alice Palmer 



Pa<je cir/htij-foKr 




First row: Georgia White, Betty Merriam, Dorothy Powell, Eleanor Allison. 

Second row: Edith Reed, Mrs. Williams, Cornelia Honda, Harriet Morgan, 
Geraldine Wilson. 

Third row: Inez King, Ruth Williams, Ruth Reede, Zelpha Stevenson, Elizabeth 
Schraegel. 

Fourth row: Leona Snow, Nellie Sterrett, Evelyn Smith, Cornelia Schubert, 
Mary Yarman. 

Fifth row: Angelia Watopolis, Hildah Grable, Esther Renko, Irene Penry, Lois 
Snvder. 



Pac/e eifjhty-fii'i 






4 




First row: Fern Selzer, Katherine McSweeny, Caroline Cliappalear, Margaret 
Carleson, Sylvia Sly. 

Second row: Angeline Marsola, Mureil White, Virginia Dunn, Margaret Welter, 
Natalie Richards. 

Third row: Florence Muntz, Hazel Larsen, Pauline Ford, Mildred Clapp, Isabel 
Klotz. 

Fourth row: Vada Mae Gartre, Alice Kennedy, Edna King, Ada Stetler, Rosalind 
Graham. 

Fifth row: Velma White, Blanche Miller, Emily Geroch, Mildred Peterson, Agnes 
Albright. 



Page eighty-six 




First row: Jean Perry, Margaret Armour, Alice Sturgill, Margaret Barnet, 
Havana Amos. 

Second row: Eleanor Jewell, Margaret Konvalinka, Freda Glasser, Delpha Hisey, 
Nellie Marinello. 

Third row: Anna Palek, Dorothy Scheflfer, Susan Lewis, Gladys Jones, Bertina 
Moores. 

Fourth row: Jeanette Krause, Thelnia Jones, Celia Lockshin, Anna Hastings, 
Vernetta Moores. 

Fifth row: Mable Sharp, Dorothy Mund, Ella Reisinger, Mildred Peterson, 
Courtney Holly. 



Page eighty-seven 




First row: Gladys Evzovich, Jennie Petkovesk, Esther Abramowitz, Virginia 
Hughes, Alice Grey. 

Second row: Cloda Knecht, Alice Kemp, Alda Holcomb, Dorothy Johnson, 
Margaret Hamrock. 

Third row: Letha Nelson, Albina Reseter, Katherine Witbeck, Marion Heyer, 
Ruth Hammerman. 

Fourth row: Genevieve Garret, Sally Peoples, Minnie Ribbet, Virginia Fuller, 
Mable Wagoner. 

Fifth row: Irene Johnson, Myrtle Reynolds, Mildred Rudge, William Douthitt, 
Ethel Muerman. 



Paye eighlij-eight 




First row: Ruth Caldwell, Elk'n Bergeson, Thelma Bond, Norma Burlnn, IIik^j 
Brajkovich. 

Second row: Ruth Cromwell, Helen Crusen, Laretta Donavan, Edward Cooey, 
Dorothy Bardolph. 

Third row; Rita Brady, Zelma Kleinsmith, Everett Johnson, Wilma Burrier, 
Ruth Beveridge. 

Fourth row: Kathryn Crum, Dorothy Clark, Celia Brobst, Vivian Blair, Adeline 
Conroy. 

Fifth row: Marylin Burris, Edna Cool, Alice Carrig, Verna Baughman, Beatrice 
Buchanan. 



Pacje eighty-nine 



p 




First row: Virginia Jones, Clara Thomas, Naomi Patterson, Jemima Allenbaugh, 
Jena Perry. 

Second row: Margaret Dales, Bessie Dornbush, Laverne Lane, Mary Jones, 
Kathryn Hattel. 

Third row: Helen Dungan, Helen Adams, Ralph Traschel, Doris Pettie, Ruth 
Faud. 

Forth row: Rhea Brady, Clara Tarr, Margaret Knapp, Thelma Tschabold, 
LaRue Diehl. 

Fifth row : Edna Heacock Geraldine High, Alice Palmer, Edna King, Rose 
Degregory. 



Paye ninety 




First row: Mary Oberlin, Teresa Mcllhone, Ethel Douglas, Mary Farres, Cloie 
Scott. 

Second row: Alice Robinson, Nellie Toba, Margaret Timmons, Albert Brumbaugh, 
Leona Slusser. 

Third row: Myrtle Hawthorne, Margaret Aten, Laura Hauschild, Ruth Glass, 
Grace Penrod. 

Fourth row: Marcella Cain, Dorothy Worley, Mary Gale, Audrey Scott, Beatrice 
Gale. 

Fifth row: Esther Swartz, Anna Johnson, Muriel Cook, Lucille Bennett, Margaret 
Schneiter. 



Page ninety-one 



{^ 




First vow: Mavy Pierce, Irene Titko, Helen Sperry, Betty Thiele, Lydia Buehl. 

Second row: Louise Hencl<e, Gertrude Watts, Marie Vesy, Celia Zoss, Marion 
Warren. 

Third row: Lavina Hiltv, Laura Kennard, Lucy Joiner, Gladys Joyner, Edna 
Pallas. ^1 

Fourth row: Rachel Raviiison, Esther Justice, Vivian Heskett, Bess Zoss, 
Margaret Weltei-. 

Fifth row: Lillian Reynolds, Alice Schoff, Clarise Thompson, Miss McCoy, Helen 
Witherstay. 



Pcic/i ni)H'tij-t>ro 




Frances Owen 
Helen Orcutt 



Mary Jean Porter 



Dorothy Johnson 
Virginia Wilson 



Parte ninety-three 




Rhodel Pearce 



Opal Nicodimus 



Mildred Mowen 



Maby Yorke 



Eleanor Rychlik 



Helen Oesch 



Marie Miller 



Dorothy Stough 



Josephine Merscera 



Pearl Woodings 



Muriel Crawl 



Sara Mae Loomis 



Page ninety-four 




ACTIVITIES 




JOURNALISM 



Page ninety-five 




O'HORO SWARTZ McGlLVERY 

Prof. Packard Murphy Webber, Editor R. Hall 

KENTON IAN STAFF 

The Kentonian is the oldest literary production published by the Kent State 
College. This magazine has endeavored thru its staff and faculty adviser to maintain 
this trifold purpose : 

1. To intere.st the faculty in the doings of the students and in their work 
at College. 

2. To publish those literary productions of the students which are of extra- 
ordinary value. 

3. To aid in holding the intere.st of the alumni and to enable them to feel an 
interest in the present students of this college. 



Pcif/c iiinctij-six 




Feldman, D. Hall, Kneifel, B. Johnstone, Williams, M. Fisher 
Taylor, Hill, Pomfrey, R. Hall, Hulme, Harris, Wright 

THE KEXT STATER 

The Kent Stater is the official college newspaper published weekly by a staff 
composed of members of the student body. The editorial staff is composed of the 
following members: Marion Fisher, Editor-in-chief, Margaret Taylor, Managing 
Editor, Albert Hill, News Editor, Harold Hulme, Feature Editor, and Wayne Pomfrey, 
Circulation Manager. 

As a member of the Ohio College Newspaper Association the Kent Stater is able 
to give its readers up to the minute information of various colleges and their activities. 
The aim of the Kent Stater is to issue a publication for the best interests of a 
Greater Kent State. 



Page ninety-seven 




Helen Blake Robert Fosnight 

Francis Jacob Prof. Satterfield Luicle Pearce 

CHESTNUT BURR BOARD OF CONTROL 



Page ninety-eight 




FOSNIGHT, CURTISS, YOUNG. ShEETZ, F. DrEW. 

ScALETTA, Blake, F. Jacob, R. Hall, Pearce. K. Fisher. 

Chestnut Burr Staff 

Robert Fosnight Editor-in-Chief 

Helen Blake Associate Editor 

Lucile Pearce Business Manager 

Francis Jacob Advertising Manager 

Antoinette Scaletta Art Editor 

Cletus Sheetz Classes Editor 

Alice Muriel Young Literary Editor 

Kathleen Fisher Snaps 

Frank Curtiss Varsity Athletics 

Marion Fisher Organization Editor 

Fred Drew Humor 

Robert Hall Associate Art Editor 



Page ninety-nine 







R. Hall Pro. Packard Dr. Anderson Fosnight 

Young Hayes M. Fisher Webber H. Blake 

CHI PI HONORARY JOURNALISTIC FRATERNITY 

A long felt need at Kent State College was met, when Chi Pi Honorary Journalistic 
Fraternity was organized, February 1, 1927. The purpose of the organization is to 
bring editors of the various publications in closer touch with each other, and to 
further the journalistic work of the college. 

Dr. David Allen Anderson and Professor Edgar Packard consented to act as 
advisors and have done much to assist in establishing the fraternity. 

Charter members are: Robert Fosnight, Editor-in-chief, and Helen Blake, Assis- 
tant Editor, The Chestnut Burr, '27; Virginia Webber, Editor, The Kentonian, '27; 
Alice Muriel Young, Editor, The Kentonian, '26; Robert Hall, Department Editor, 
The Kentonian, '26-'27; Margaret Hayes, Editor, The Kent Stater, '26. 

The Chi Pi pin consists of a key designed by Robert Hall. 

Until such time as a Department of Journalism can be established at Kent State, 
it is felt that this fraternity can play an active part in shouldering the responsibilities 
of the various publications. 



Page one hundred 



ART DEPARTMENT 





Page one hundred one 



% 




THE KINDERGARTEN 

The Kindergarten in the Kent State Training School is the only kindergarten 
in the community. This year the enrollment totaled sixty-eight children, the largest 
number the school has ever had. Subsequently it became necessary to have both a 
morning and an afternoon kindergarten session in order to accommodate all the 
children. Bus transportaion is provided for all who desire it at the nominal fee of 
cen cents per day. 

The kindergarten room is a large, light, well ventilated room on the ground 
floor. It is fully equipped with the many and varied materials of the kindergarten. 
In addition it now possesses a play screen and furniture. This splendid addition was 
the work of the Kindergarten-Primary Department in the College and came as a gift 
from them. 

The activities in the kindergarten include almost every phase of subject mat- 
ter in the elementary curriculum. However, the method used is one of correlation 
of subject matter. This is accomplished through individual and group projects, birth- 
day celebrations and excursions. Most of the projects centered about Hallowe'en, 
Thanksgiving, Christmas, Valentines Day, Washington's Birthday, Easter, and the 
May Day Party. Three larger and more extensive projects were those based upon 
the home, the community, and the farm. Excursions through the community, to the 
post-office and to the farm accompanied the project work and were thoroughly enjoyed 
by the children. Birthdays and holidays, too, are celebrated appropriately. 

The Mothers' Club is an active and vitally interested organization associated wth 
and affiliated with the kindergai'ten. The Mothers gather bi-monthly for discussion 
of child problems and for a social hour. 



Page one hundred two 




DRAMA AND MUSIC 



Page one himdred three. 




Keener, Scott, Dungan, Drake, Beveridge, Bond, Forsythe, Clakk, 

Johnson, Francis 

Snyder, Halstead, White, King, Elgin, Hulsman, Nihowsen, Richards, 

Lewis, De Geegorie, Chapelire, Merlin, Gaston, Wright, Hull, Hayes 

GIRL'S CHORUS 

The Special Music Department is increasing in quality and quantity each year. 
It is composed of about forty girls. 

Class work consists of methods, piano, voice, harmony, and conducting lessons. 
The department furnishes musical programs for chapel exercises during the year, 
and gave an Operetta, "Miss Cherry Blossom," which was well attended. 



Page one hundred four 




Merlin, Byler, Crow, Keener, Henley, Chenevey, Schwartz, L. Hall, R. Hall, 

POMFREY, MERRIL, MuRPHEY'. 

MEN'S GLEE CLUB 



Page one hundred five 



,,'J 

•Mi 




THE ORCHESTRA 

The Orchestra of Kent State College is an active organization that features in 
many of the college assemblies. It does some very interesting pieces and expects to 
do several very lovely compositions for graduation. 

Miss Grace King, the director, believes in giving the orchestra a chance to play 
many different types of music, even giving it an opportunity to play modern and 
popular music. 

The orchestra meets twice a week in Miss King's room at seven o'clock on Tuesday 
evening and ten o'clock on Thursday morning. 

Miss King spends a great deal of time and thought in endeavoring to make the 
orchestra a vital force on the college campus. 



Page one hnndred six 




Beechy 

GORHAM 



POMFREY 

E. Johnson 



DRAMATIC CLUB 



Among the outstanding and flourishing organizations at Kent State is the Velvet 
Curtain Players. This club, composed of thirty members chosen from the school, 
has been a live, active, vi'orking body throughout the year. 

With Miss Nellie Herman as supervisor and faculty adviser, the club has been 
able to reflect a type of vi^ork that is not only creditable to itself, but to the college. 

Perhaps its greatest achievement was the production of Booth Tarkington's 
"Ghost Story," which was given at the "Pop" Concert. The play not only created great 
interest but revealed the dramatic ability of the club. It typified that spirit of co- 
operation which is necessary for the production of every play. 

Plans are being made for the Homecoming play, and at that time the Velvet Cur- 
tain Players will again appear and demonstrate to the college its ability in fostering 
and developing dramatics. 



Page one hundred seven 



1^ 



m 



THE CHESTNUT BURR 

In me you find the record of a year 

Which Time has taken to an Unknown land. 

I keep in rock the words you write on sand 

And writing pass; I am the smile — the tear — 

The song you sang one morning when the spring 

Was fair among the roses; — I am truth. 

My two-edged sword will clip the silveiy wing 

Of age — I am the keeper of your Youth. 

The memories which cluster round the hill. 
The Dorm and walks I will keep clean and true. 
My flowers fade not — my sky is always blue. 
In me is beauty Time can never kill. 
My voice will bid life's waning sun stand still 
While those I cherish dream old dreams anew. 



Page one hundred eight 




COLLEGE LIFE 



Page one hundred nine 




Page one hundred ten 




Page one hundred eleven 




Page one hundred twelve 







'*?*'»'- 



ill 







V t 






Vv 



4^J«« 




pr 



\/\ 



i 



r ti'*^ 






Pafife one. hundred thirteen 




Page one hundred fourteen 




Page one hundred fifteen 




Parje one hundred sixteen 



-^Y'M T^ 







Twf-t-iM' '""^^i 



Page one hundred seventeen 




Robert Hall Agnes Ouinlan 

MOST P O P IT L A R STUDENTS 

Faces wreathed in smiles would win first prizes in most anything, thought college 
students in selecting Robert Hall, Ravenna, and Miss Agnes Quinlan, Coshocton, as 
the most popular man and most popular woman student on the campus. 

The contest was conducted in connection with the sale of The Chestnut Burr. 
All students ordering annuals were given an opportunity to vote for a most popular 
man and woman. 

Mr. Hall is a member of Delta Phi Sigma fraternity and is a sophomore. He 
is a member of the editorial staff of tlie Kent Stater and The Chestnut Burr. 

Miss Quinlan, besides being the most popular girl, is a senior in the '27 diploma 
class, is a college cheerleader, captain of a girls' athletic team, and goes in for other 
activities. She is not a member of any sorority. She took first place in the contest 
in a field of "seven opponents who had sorority affiliations. 

"Quinnie," is the most popular co-ed's nickname. Hall goes by the name of "Bob." 

The two most popular were congratulated by hosts of admiring friends after first 
announcement of the contest had been made by Robert Fosnight, editor of The Chest- 
nut Burr. 

It is planned to conduct a similar contest next year. 



Page one hundred eighteen 




ORGANIZATIONS 




m. 



A' 



f} 



-s 








SORORITIES 



Page one hundred nineteen 



SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA 

Founded at Virginia State Teacher's College, Farmville, Va., 1898 

21 Chapters 

Kent, Alpha Beta Chapter — 1925 

ACTIVES 

Seniors 



Helen Blake 
Lucile Pearce 
Jane Gibson 
Edith Heard 



Marion Morsbach 
Alice Elgin 
Laura Fleming 

Mary Jean Porter 
Gladys Jones 

Dorothy Hall 
Lida Straight 



Feme C. Strawn Gerren 

Juniors 
Pauline Gaston 

Sophomores 



Freshmen 



Mildred Rudge 

PLEDGES 



Gertrude BeSaw 
Genevieve Wright 
Marion Fisher 
Lois Kestle 



Thelma Hamilton 
Elizabeth Truscott 



Esther Gee 
Agnes Albright 



Dorothy Weirick 

FACULTY MEMBERS 

Miss Mona Fletcher 

PATRONS AND PATRONESSES 

Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Stopher 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy Smith 



Geraldine Wilson 
Lois Fenn 



Page one hundred twenty 



■sS^^i'v-sSjgp. 




Page one hundred twenty-one 



Elizabeth Boyd 
Jessie Bradshaw 
Meriia Elliman 

Sydonah Buckley 
Vilura Camp-Burdett 
Thelma Davis 

Vir,a:inia Jones 
Eveline Kneifel 

Ruth Glass 



DELTA SIGMA EPSILON 

Founded at Miami University, 191G 

23 Chapters 

Kent, Tau Chapter, 192G 

ACTIVES 

Sevio>s 
Dorothea Harris 

Rhea Johnson-George 
Evelyn Long 
Frances Blake-Morris 
Soj-)hn>iwies 



Lucv 



Stadler 



PLEDGES 
Idabelle Harris 

FACULTY MEMBERS 

Isabelle Rooney Oktavec 
Bess Dunstan Rider 

PATRONS AND PATRONESSES 

Prof. Frank L. Oktavec 
Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Donaghy 



Christine Steinmetz 
Henrietta Strayer 
Virginia Webber 

Margaret Taylor 
Esther Venner 
Dixie Wales 

Mary MacGillivary 
Dorothy Worley 

Helen Lane 



Page one hundred tiventy-two 







■ -; ^ ,^^ 


it V 

1 


^ 




*1 



Pa(/e one hundred twenty-three 



■-. ^-^ 






m 



ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA 

Founded at Virginia State Teacher's College, 1901 

17 Chapters 

Kent, Ohio, Omicron Omicron Chapter, 1926 

ACTIVES 

Seniors 



Hazel Keeiiei' 

Hilda Bachman 

Henrietta Eeecliy 
Jean Gorham 

Eleanor Drake 
Eleanor Rowney 
Helen Dungan 

Rosalind Graham 
Carol Hauschildt 
Teresa McHhone 



Jiiiiiofs 
Soplioiiwres 

F)ef:hi)iev 
PLEDGES 



Alice Young- 
Antoinette Link 



Naomi Johnson 
Helen Murphy 



Happy Sapp 
Alice Sturo-ill 



Lois Snyder 
Dorothy Stough 
Elsie Stroup 



FACULTY MEMBERS 

Miss Ada Hyatt 

Mr. and Mrs. Merle Wagoner 

PATRONS AND PATRONESSES 

Mr. and Mrs. James Green 
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Gressard 
Mr. and Mrs. Hale Thompson 



Prir/e ovc hiiiHh'cd fivenfji-fow 




Par/e one hundred tiventy-five 



Kuth Sweeney 
Lucile Ewing' 
Irnia Bate 
Marion Laird 



THETA SIGMA UPSON 

Kansas State Teacher's College, Emporia, 1922 

7 Chapters 

Kent, Eta, 1926 

ACTIVES 

Seniors 

Katlileeii Fisher 
Ethel Freskcnet 
Hazel Cook 
Mable Strauss 



IVIary Oberlin 
IMargaret Timmons 



Jiniioi! 



Laura Hauschild 



Alice Palmer 
Marjorie Hawley 



Virginia Bundy 



Alice Erwin 
Doris Petit 
Gertrude Delanty 



Marilyn Burris 
Thelma Hensel 



FACULTY MEMBERS 

Miss L Hazen 

PATRONS AND PATRONESSES 

Dr. and Mrs. Schmidt 

Mr. and Mrs. L. W. Miller 

Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Gillespie, Jr. 



^^U 



Parjc one hundred tieentij-six 



-*& 



v^ *4».. :i_ ■^-.w'T i ^i "s^v^ -^ 




Pf((/e o?ie hundred twenty-seven 






Fou 



Thelma Ankrim 
Jeannette Carnes 
Catherine Ladd 

Dorothy Grimm 
Evelyn Horton 

Margaret Aten ■ 
Alice Gray 



Dorothy Clark 
Fredda Glasser 
Mary M. Lockard 



PI KAPPA SIGMA 

NDED AT Michigan State Teacher's College, 1894 
17 Chapters 
Kent, Ohio, Psi Chapter, 1926 

ACTIVES 



Soiiors 



Juniors 

Fresihmen 

Myrtle Hawthorne 
PLEDGES 



Harriet L. Myers 
Dorothy Stewart 
Alice Wire 

Beatrice Johnstone 
Neva Zuver 

Anna Johnstone 
Grace Penrod 



Betty Merrinian 
Helen Snowden 
Dorothy Waltenbaugh 

PATRONS AND PATRONESSES 

Miss Nellie Berman 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Davey 
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Clark 



Paye one hnndrcd twcnty-ciyht 









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Page one hundred ticcntij-iiino 



ALPHA SIGMA TAU 

Pounded at Michigan State Normal College, 1899 
Kent State College, Eta Chapter, 1927 



Helen Crooks 
Evelyn Williams 
Mary Dickson 
Agnes Black 

Sara Peoples 
Dorothy Shaffer 
Helen Orcutt 
Mildred Nihousen 

Ruby Dort 

Mary Cook 



Seniors 



Juniors 



Sophomores 
Jane Mason 

Freshmen 
La Rue Diehl 

FACULTY MEMBERS 



Florence Keyser 
Agnes O'Horo 
Eileen Huelsman 
Marvel Holmes 

Muriel White 
Frances Owen 
Laverne Lane 
Geraldine High 

Helen Sidell 

Helen Lauser 



Miss Laura Hill 

PATRONS AND PATRONESSES 

Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Manchester 

Mr. and Mrs. Dick Donaghy 



Page one hundred thirty 






4^4 .i-% I 




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^•. ii»g »..wt.-.^ 



Pajre owe hundred thirtu-one 




PHI EPSiLON SORORITY 





Fou 


NDED AT Kent State 
ACTIVES 
Sciiiofs 


College, 11)24 


Grace Davidow 






Beatrice Giber 


Betty Feldman 




Lillian Matlas 

Juniorn 


Marian Levy 


Esther Abramowitz 






Bess Zoss 


Celia Lockshin 




Evelyn Natharius 


Celia Zoss 



FACULTY MEMBERS 

Miss Grace H. Swan 

PATRONS AND PATRONESSES 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Rosenberg 



Page one hundred thirty-two 




Blanche Miller 



Lila Ellsworth 
Estelle Ester ly 



PSI CHI NU SORORITY 

Founded at Kent State College, 1927 
ACTIVES 



Seniors 

Alice Fate Murlin 

Juniors 



Adelaide Conry 



Avis Copeland 
Ann Brown 



FACULTY ADVISER 

Bertha A. Lively 

PATRONS AND PATRONESSES 

Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Johnson 



Page one hundred thirty-three 







Geiber, Brown, Ewing, Bates, Siddel, Horton, Crooks, Bachman, Morris, 
Elgin, Stadler, A. Young, Hyatt, Adviser, Zuver, Stewert, H. Blake, Sweeny, 
Williams. Keener, D. Harris, President, Ellsworth, Copeland, Rice. 

PAN-HELLENIC 

Officers 

Chairman Dorothea Harris 

Secretary Alice Young 

Treasurer Alice Elgin 

Faculty Adviser Ada Hyatt 

REPRESENTATIVES 

Sigma Sigma Sigma Morris, Elgin, Blake 

Delta Sigma Epsilon Stadler, Webber, Harris 

Alpha Sigma Alpha Keener, Young, Bachman 

Theta Sigma Epsilon Sweeney, Bates, Ewing 

Pi Kappa Sigma Stewart, Horton, Zuver 

Gamma Sigma Phi Crooks, Williams, Siddel 

Phi Epsilon Geiber, Brown 

Psi Chi Nu Rice, Ellsworth, Copeland 



Page one hundred thirty-four 




FRATERNITIES 



Page one hundred thirty-five 



^ 



KAPPA MU KAPPA 

Founded at Kent State College, 1922 
Kent, Alpha Chapter, 1927 

ACTIVES 

Sciiiofs 



Eugene Feeley 
Ben Colville 

Kenneth Cook 
Paul Burkett 

Frank Curtiss 
Wayne Pomfiey 
Leslie Downs 

Frank V. Webb, Jr. 

Rov Ober 



Jinjiors 
Paul Levering 
Donald Menough 

Sophoino)'cfi 
Joe DeLeone 
William Searl 
Claude Vair 

F)'ef<h))iev 

PLEDGES 

FACULTY MEMBERS 
Prof. L. S. Ivins 
Mr. Alex Whyte 



August Peterka 
Ralph Rogers 

J. E. Spinneweber 
Jack Chernin 

Edward Harris 
J. E. Harriman 
Norbert Mac Dermott 

Evertt Johnson 

Elmer Pettay 



/ aae one hundred thirty-six 





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Pa£fe one hundred thirty-seven 



DETA PHI SIGMA 

Founded at Kent State Normal College, 1923 







ACTIVES 




'i 


Virgil Shilling 
Frank Hall 


Seniors 
Walter Youngen 
Claude Bergett 

Juniors 
Herman Chapman 
Paul Van Dusen 


Burdette Weave; 
Frank Hanna 




Ralph Spangler 


Sopho7nores 
Carl Henderson 


Merril Fuller 




Oris Curie 


Robert Bohecker 


Harold Dunlavy 




Earl Wiekle 


Robert Hall 


Lewis Bailey 




Harold Polen 


Sherman Crow 


Kenneth Nash 




Paul Apley 


Freshmen 
Robert Kelso 


Lewis Hall 




Vere Beck 


PLEDGES 


Donald Baker 



FACULTY ADVISOR 
Prof. Rumold 



Page one hrm.dred thirtii-eight 




Page one hundred thirty-nine 



GAMMA TAU DELTA 

Kent State College, Alpha Chapter, 1925 
ACTIVES 







Seviofs 




Jason C. Murlin 




Juviors 


Or en Casey 


Roy Johnson 






Ward W. Davis 


Merle Murphy 






Roy Merrell 


Clarence Chenevey 


Chester 


Davis 
SophomorcK 


Harley Eldridge 


Claude Graber 






Albert Heritage 


Karl Muster 






Archie Davis 


Lawrence Gatchell 









Daniel Stratton 
Mei'edith Bryan 



Ficslmioi 

Fred Drew 

PLEDGES 

Edward Coey 

FACULTY ADVISER 

Prof. Eniniett C. Stopher 



Ralph Trachsel 
William E. Tab]er 



Page one hnndred forty 




Page one hundred forty-one 




Harold Polen, Ben Colville, Claude Graber. 

INTRA-FRATERNITY COUNCIL 

With the organization of new fraternities, there has developed a need for definite 
understandings between them. To take care of these needs, the Intra-Fraternity 
Council was formed. This, being its initial year, it may seem that not much was 
accomplished but to those who composed it, a nucleus of an organization which will 
build for unison and solidarity among the fraternities, is very apparent. 

To produce cooperation instead of intrigue and antagonism and to unite the 
fraternal organizations into a happy and harmonious family are the chief aims of 
the Council. It is planned by another year to establish a definite system of pledging; 
to encourage "open-house" meetings and to hold All-Fraternity social functions. 

Also plans to promote, through competitive contests, spirit in scholarship and 
athletics are being formed. Each fraternity has manifested a fine spirit of cooperation 
in every way, and by another year the Intra-Fraternity Council will take its place 
among the most valuable organizations of the college. 

There are at present three fraternities in the Council. These, with their 
presidents, are : 

Kappa Mu Kappa Ben R. Colville 

Delta Phi Sigma Harold Polen 

Gamma Tau Delta Claude Graber 



Page one hundred forty-two 




CLUBS 



Page one hundred forty-three 




Back Row — Claude Graber, Duane Stambak.h, Kenneth Cook, Mr. Manchester 
Front Row — Irma Bates, Mary Leasure, Dean Blanch Verder, Dlxie Wales 

KENT STATE COUNCIL 



Page one hundred forty-four 




BUNDY, MOKSBACH, DeAN VERDER, H. MyERS 

Strayer (President), Kneifle, Ray, Hayes. McGilvery 
\\- O :\I E X ' S LEAGUE 

What is the Women's League? It is the one society in which evei-y woman 
student at Kent State College enjoys membership. It has but one aim! That is to 
render the greatest service possible to all college women and to promote greater 
college spirit. 

The League holds a most prominent place among the college organizations. It 
is active along both social and educational lines. One all-college dance is given every 
term by the League, and a tea dance is held, after each registration, in honor of the 
new students. A reception and dance in honor of our Alumni is given at "Home 
Coming" each year. 

This year the League is sponsoring a Mothers' and Fathers' Day Celebration 
which is to be some time in May. It is hoped that this will become an annual custom. 

In the way of educational activity the League is responsible for two or more 
Assembly programs each term, including the Arbor Day Program in the Spring. 
These programs are always of the most entertaining and profitable type. 



Page one hundred forty-five 



if 




E. Johnson, Feely 
W. Davis, Polen, Woolman 

M E N ' S U N I N 

The Men's Union exists for the purpose of promoting a closer feeling of fellow- 
ship and equality among the college men. While smaller groups are quite select, the 
Union includes every man, who by virtue of his registration, shall be considered a 
member. 

During the past year, the Union had been very active. In the fall term, two gym 
parties were held, in which the men students became assimilated into the common 
group, through competitive games and general recreation. In the winter quarter, 
a banquet was held in Lowry Hall, which proved to be by far the biggest event of 
the year. The program was built around the general theme, "What I am going to 
do for Kent State." This was excellently answered by representatives of the fra- 
ternities and Y. M. C. A., and by outside speakers, including President Anderson, 
Judge Rockwell, County Supt. McDowell, Dr. Chandler, Prof. Gorman, Mayor W. I. 
Harvey. Dean Manchester acted as toastmaster while G. F. Elgin added "lots of 
pep" with his excellent song leading. 

The Spring affair was a Men's Union Dance held in Moulton Hall on March 12, 
where a very delightful evening was enjoyed. 

The Union has been governed during the year by a board of five men chosen 
by the men students in attendance at the banquet. These will function until a Con- 
stitution and By-Laws have been definitely adopted. 



Page one hundred forty-siv 




Brown, Drake, Copeland 
Kestle, Gibson, Elgin, Trescott 

OFF C A IM P U S W O INI E N ' S CLUB 

The women students of Kent State who do not live in either of the dormitories, 
belong- to the OflF Campus group. Within this group is the Off Campus Women's Club, 
which is a thoroughly organized group. Its hospitality to new girl students, and 
its wholesome companionship among all its members make it a real force for up-lift 
at Kent State. 

On each registration day, the club gives a tea to which all of the new off campus 
girls are invited. In addition, the club arranges, during the year, for a certain 
number of activities — mostly social. Certain of these social functions, by reason of 
their popularity in the past, have now become annual affairs in the club calendar; 
especially the Harvest Party in November, The Pop Entertainment in December, May 
Day Breakfast in the college woods. The Off Campus Club Banquet at Home Coming, 
and several specialty club parties in the club room. 

In the autumn term. Miss Lois Kestle was elected president to serve until the 
midyear, when Miss Alice Elgin succeeded her. Miss Kestle's service to the club was 
unstinted, and she with her able assistants accomplished much for the club. Miss 
Elgin's presidency promises to be both constructive and progressive. 
'"Tis due the O. C. K. S. Girls 

A tiny bit of praise. 

They help to boost with pep and song. 

And Kent State's banners raise. 

All know full well the charm they lend, 

That brightens college days, 

Then, hurrah for the Off Campus Girls," 



Page one hiuidred fortijseven 




SOCIAL SCIENCE CLUB 

A new type of campus organization came into being when the Social Science 
CUib reorganized, November 18, 1926, as a dinner club, with a roster of 60 members. 
On the third Thursday of every month the members gather around the dinner table 
to discuss problems of the day in the light of their relation to education. 

The officers of the year who have worked under Professor H. D. Byrne as adviser 
are: Russell Woolman, president; Dorothea Harris, vice-president; Elizabeth Boyd, 
secretary; Virginia Jones, treasurer; Committee chairman, Gwendolyn Drew, mem- 
bership; Cletus Scheetz, program; Elizabeth Truscott, social; and Margaret Hayes, 
publicity. 

Out of town speakers were Mr. Paul Packard, Cleveland, who discussed "The 
Press and its Relation to Education" on January 20; and Mr. W. L. Connor, Director 
of Research, Cleveland Public Schools, who spoke on March 17 on the subject of the 
changing curriculum. 



Pa,jc 



Iuiii(h-cd flirt !i-vig)it 




LuiCLE Pearce 
Beatrice Johnstone Anna Wells 

Y. W. C. A. CABINET 



Dixie Wales 

Marion Fisher 



Page one hundred forty-nine 



^'1 



\r 




Mrs Oktavec E. Tarr G. Drew Mr. Oktavec 

M. Leashue H. Blake E. Long A. Elgin M. Ellimen 

PHYSICAL E D U C A T I O N CLUB 

Because of the many phases of physical education work and tlie interest shown by 
different members of the department, Mr. and Mrs. Oktavec organized a Physical Educa- 
tion Club, inviting as members those students from the department who seemed most 
interested. 

Discussions and debates have been held concerning various subjects, such as 
"Formal versus Informal Physical Education" and other problems arising in teaching. 

It is hoped that the Club will prove a permanent oi'ganization in this department. 



Paffe one hundred jiffi/ 




WOMEN'S ATHLETICS 



Page one hundred fifty-one 



BUCCANEER AND IMUSKETEER ACTIVITIES 

Buccaneer! Musketeer! Names that have emblazoned themselves on the halls of 
Kent State College as symbolizing all that is finest and most loyal in women's extra- 
curricular activities. May this spirit that has grown from small beginnings not depart 
with the graduates of this year, but linger to battle with the rookies of the future. 

For the bold Buccaneer and the gallant Musketeer were each once but an idea the 
possibilities of which four people pondered over one December day of 192.5. 

"What do you think of it?" the Field Marshall leaned back in his chair and 
glanced inquiringly through the dusk at the Admiral and the General. 

These two worthy officers looked at each other and then at the Commander-in- 
Chief. 

"Can it be done?" they parried. 

"The girls must answer that" came the reply. "If they have spirit, loyalty and a 
love of the game, it can be done." 

So the plans laid in a small office in Wills Gymnasium were launched with the 
new year. Henrietta Strayer, in the arrogant costume of a pirate king, and Helen 
Blake, in the swaggering uniform of a Musketeer, stormed Assembly one January 
morning in 1926, and explained the scheme. As they had hoped this surprise attack 
brought in many captives, and it was two well-matched teams that met in an affair 
of arms at the first tournament. 

Could it be done? Girls who had never felt the burn of the floor on a tender knee 
soon became plucky basketeers. Others whose only knowledge of tennis had been 
that of the sport costume necessary when viewing a set, rose at four in the morning 
to practice on the dew-soaked courts. 

Loyal support, too, came from the faculty members who willingly and enthusi- 
astically turned out to referee the field meets. 

The hours of untiring labor, advice and life itself that Professor and Mrs. Frank 
L. Oktavec have put into the B. and M. project are beyond the measure of words. 
They have woven themselves into the very fibre of the teams. 

It was not until the fall term of 1926 that the activities went outside the realm 
of sport, and embraced all women's activities, elected honors, health and studies, 
with a "K" as the insignia of the all around Kent State woman. 

A committee of ten elected that the Buccaneer man-o'-war be steered by Edna 
Tarr, and that Musketeer tactics be directed by Gwendolyn Drew. These officers 
have shown themselves to be gallant leaders, and their warriors have fought nobly. 

Whether or not she has reached the final achievement of a "K", all hail to the 
Buccaneer and the Musketeer! 



Page one hundred fifty-two 




Edna Tarr 
Admiral of Buccaneers 

Mrs. Apple 



Mr. Oktavec 
MUSKETEER AND BUCCANEER OFFICIALS 



Gwendolyn Drew 

General of Musketeer.^^ 
Mrs. Oktavec 



/) 



Page one hundred fifty-thri: 




ALL STAR BUCCANEER SOCCER TEA:M 

"Hank" Strayer, Captain 
First How: Mary Deur, Esther Gee, "Hank" Strayer, Captain, Kathryn Ross, 
Lois Snyder. 

Second Row: Elizabeth Boyd, Edna Tarr, Henrietta Beechy. 
Third Row: Peg Taylor, Marge Blalock. 
Fourth Row: Dorothy Bickel. 



Page one hnudred fifty-four 




ALL STAR :\IUSKETFER SOCCER TEAM 
Helen Blake, Captain 
First Row: Henricks, Hurlbut, Witroski, Blake. 
Second Row: Lane, Wells, Drew, Long. 



J'] 



Page one hundred fifty-five 






'vi 





% ^^ ' 35 




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ALL STAR MUSKETKER BASKETBALL TEA:\I 

"Ev" Long, Captain 

Capriato, Lane, Wells, Gale, Hendricks, Thomas 

McGiLVERY, Blake, Long, Witroski 



Pnge one htivdrcd fifty-six 




ALL STAR liASE FOOTIJALL I'EA.MS 

Honda, Francis, Perry, Hamrock, Johnson, Thomas, Jones, Klotz, Brobst, 
L. Hauschild, Zuver. 

Pearce, Wright, Drake, Capriato, Brakovitch, Scroguie, Orcutt Myers, Capts. 



I'. 



Page one hundred fifti/seven 



^ 



\. 




BULLFROGS—VOLLEY BALL 

Dorothy Bickle, Captain 
Top row, left to right: E. Jewell, G. Wright, V. Webber, M. Rexroth, E. Kay. 
Lower row, left to right: M. Leasure, D. Bickle, Captain, M. Stauder. 



Page one hitiidred fiftii-eight 




BASKETEERS 

Agnes Albright, Captain 

Top row, left to right: Agnes Quinlan, IVIargaret Taylor, Alice Elgin, Alene 
IVIUTER, Anna Palek. 

Lower row, left to right: Sydonah Buckley, Lois Snyder, Agnes Albright, 
Captain, Hilda Grable, Ethel Muerionan. 



Page one hundred fifty-nine 




MARINERS 

Mary McGillivray, Captain 
Top row, left to right: M. Carlson, E. Long, R. Hammerman. 
Lower row, left to right: E. Abromovitz, D. Pettit, M. McGillivray, Captain, 
Jones, B. Feldman. 



Page o»c huiidfcd sixty 







BEATEMS 

Esther Gee, Captain 
Top row, left to right: Idabell Harris, "Happy" Sapp, Georgiana Reed. 
Lower row, left to right: Elizabeth Schraegel, Harriet Meyer, Esther Gee, 
Captain, Evelyn Kneifel, Virginia Wilson. 



Page one hundred sixty-one 




MINIKINS 

Anna Wells, Captain 

B. Gale, Zuver, Thiele 

WiTROSKi, Wells, H. Blake 



Page one hundred sixiy-tivi. 




"BOOGIES" 
Henrietta Strayer, Captain 
Top row, left to right: M. Peirce, L. Hauschild, A. Irwin. 

Lower row, left to right: M. Deur, H. Orcutt, H. STRA-i-ER, Captain, V. Buckman, 
C. Honda. 



Page one hundred sixty- three 




MIDGETS 
Helen Lane, Captain 
Top row, left to right: H. Thomas, V. Fuller, M. Moore, E. Reed, S. Lewis. 
Lower row, left to right: L. Wyman, E. Smith, H. Lane, Captain, B. Gale, 
M. LOCKARD. 



I'arjc one hitiidrcd nixfu-four 




M. Z. T^s. 

LuciLE Hendricks, Captain 
Top row, left to right: E. Cook, L. Snow, H. Ramsey, M. Hawthorne, 

M. HURLBUT. 

Lower row, left to right: N. Marinelli, R. Waxler, L. Hendricks, Captain, 
M. Malamphy, M. Capriato. 



rje 07ie hundred sixty-five 



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A T T L E R S 



ASKETBALL 



Blalock, Captain - 

Ross Francis Johnson Brajkovich 

Priddy Blalock Armour 



Page one hundred sixty-six 



"CHAMPS' 



Esther Gse — Buccaneer 
Target Toss 



'Chris" Stinmetz — Musketeer 
Horse-shoe Pitching 



'Hank" Strayer — Buccaneer 
Paddle-Tennis 




Page one hundred sixty-seven 



"^ 



A "K" GIRL 

A "K" Girl is an ideal college representative. She will leave the portals of the 
institution that has nurtured her destined to be a perfect human being — ready in 
vision, in knowledge, in health and in social adaptability to meet life. In awarding 
her the letter of her Alma Mater, her happy mentors are merely symbolizing their 
awareness of her magnitude. They are acknowledging and proclaming that she has 
voluntarily assimilated all the big things Kent State College has offered. She has 
participated in college outside school activities that have culminated in giving life 
to what may have been only unspeaking walls and in giving her experiences in fields 
only indirectly related to her particular profession; she has delved into her studies 
with a desire to grasp all the truths and gathered all the material essential for 
a teacher of wisdom and a person influential in any phase of life; she has striven 
for the maximum of health, knowing that only with a strong machine could she produce 
her maximum as a teacher and as a member of society. 
To the "K" Girl: 

CONGRATULATIONS! And— when in the world where material awards for 
greatness are not always given, will you recall your "K", the award of your college 
days, and revive the urge that prompted you then. 



Page one himdred sixty-eight 




VARSITY ATHLETICS 



Page one hundred sixty-7iine 



V 




WILLS GYMNASIUM 

Kent State College has one of the finest gymnasiums in the state of Ohio. There 
is hardly a day goes by without finding it crowded to its limits. When other colleges 
visit Kent to play either a football or basketball game, everyone is interested in the 
gymnasium. During the last year three high school basketball tournaments were 
held in Wills Gymnasium. There is ample space in the gymnasium to seat thousands 
of spectators and enough playing space to allow three games to be played at once. 

In the basement of the building is one of the finest swimming pools one could 
desire. The pool is under direction of Mrs. E. Irwin and is in constant use. 



Page one Jatndred seventy 




ATHLETIC BOARD 

Dr. DeWeese Chairman 

Mr. Pearce Faculty 

Mr. Davey Faculty 

Mr. Oktavec Physical Education Department 

Mr. Wagoner Coach 

Frank Curtiss Representative four-year course 

Abe Schwartz Representative two-year course 

Miss Berman Faculty 

Miss Beechy Representative four-year course 

Miss Lane Representative two-year course 



Page one hundred seventy-one 



4 








V A 


R S I 1 


. y ■ . K " 


C L 


U B 










OFFICERS 








Eugene Feeley. 
Joseph DeLeon 
Edward Harris, 


Eye. N 

:, Kent, 

Raven n 


Y 

Ohio 

a, Ohio... 






President 

Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 










LETTERMEN 
















FOOTBALL 












....■27 
. ..'27 


Menoukh 

Levering 
C. Davis 
Chernin 
Thomas 
A. Davis 




. . '28 


CURTISS 

Searl 

R. Hall 

Spangler 

Graber 

McDermott 

Dunlavy 

Kelso 

M. McDermott 






Captain-elect . . 


'28 

'28 


'29 






...•27 

'27 

'27 

....'27 
'27 








...'28 








'28 








'28 








'28 














BASKETBALL 




...'30 


McDermott, Captain 
Vair, Captain-elect 




....'29 
....'29 
....'29 
'29 


DeLeone 
Harris . 




....'29 

'29 

'29 


Rogers 

Feeley 


...'27 
...'27 


Grabeb : 


Peterka 


BASEBALL 


'27 










'27 


Toot . . . 
A. Davis 

POLEN . . 


TENNIS 


....'27 
....'28 
'29 










....'27 
....'27 






COLVILLE 














..'27 Smith 
MANAGERS 


















-FOOTB 

-Bask 
-Bask 


all 














.TBALL 
^TBALL 












DeLeone— 








'25-'26 





HONORARY MEMBER 
Coach — Merle E. Wagoner 



Page one hundred seventy-two 



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Page one hundred seventy-three 







VARSITY FOOTBALL TEAM 

Weikel, MgT., Davis, Curtiss, Burkett, Fuller, Wagoner, Coach, Schwartz, 
Graber, Crow, Downes, Bohecker, Menough, Captain, Peterka, Feeley, Dunlavy, 
Levering. 

A. Davis, Spangler, Rogers, Chernin, Colville, Thomas, Vair, Searle. 



Page otie hundred seveniy-fom 



FOOTBALL SEASON 

WITTENBERG 

Aftei' two weeks of hard training the Kent team journeyed to Springfield to meet 
one of the strongest teams in the State, Wittenberg, where defeat was met with 
a score of 27-0. With only 18 men on the squad, the Silver Foxes fought every 
minute of the game and went down to noble defeat. 

When West Liberty brought a team to Rockwell field more men were back, and 
many nights had been spent in practice to meet the team whom Kent had de- 
feated in 1925, 7-6. 

Overconfidence resulting from the splendid showing at Springfield, and too much 
Potts gave the second game to West Liberty 25-2. 

HEIDELBERG 

In the second Ohio Conference game of the year Kent received another setback 
25-0. In this game Captain Don Menough was injured in the first quarter, and 
taken out until the end of the season. 

ASHLAND 

Unable to score a victory thus far, the team went south to Ashland to play 
before a large Homecoming crowd with determination to win. Ashland, however, 
had its best team in years, and the Blue and Gold wilted before a score of 55-0. 

EDINBORO 

Not discouraged from previous showings, Kent State met her old rival, Edinboro, 
on Rockwell field and won the first victory of 1926, 12-0. The game was fought out 
on a water-soaked gridiron, and the first touchdown of the year was scored by 
Schwartz. All the men played a fine game. 

FINDLAY 

With memories of a 12-0 defeat of last year the team went after the scalp of 
Findlay College. After out-playing their opponents for three quarters, Kent's 
defense weakened, and Findlay scored a touchdown and kicked goal to a 7-6 verdict. 

INDIANA 

As usual Indiana Normal came to Kent loaded, and took away a score of 23-0. 
The game was played before a large and enthusiastic crowd, but Wagoner's men 
seemed to lack the fight possessed by Indiana. 

WILMINGTON 

Last of the year the greatest game of football ever played on Rockwell field found 
Kent State a winner, 15-14 over Wilmington College. The game was thrilling 
throughout. Wilmington scored two touchdowns in the first period, but Kent did not 
give up. Searle and Schwartz came back and carried the ball over for touchdowns, 
but missed the kick. This gave Wilmington a 14-12 lead. With one minute to play 
Joe DeLeone made a perfect dropkick and won the game. It was a fitting ending for 
the season. 



Paye one hundred novcnty-five 




Top Row: Coach, Wagoner, Whyte, Rogers, Searle, Henley, Fuller, Manager. 
Bottom Row: Graber, Peterka, DeLeone, MacDermott, Captain, Curtiss, 
Vair, Captain-elect. 

VARSITY BASKETBALL RESULTS 



Kent State 12 Mt. Union 

Kent State 19 Baldwin Wallace. 

Kent State 29 Kenyon 

Kent State 20 Hiram 

Kent State 30 Indiana Normal. . 

Kent State 12 Kenyon 

Kent State 14. . Case 

Kent State 18 Wilmington 

Kent State 9 Cedarville 

Kent State 24 Bliss 

Kent State 21 Wilmington 

Kent State 29 Slippery Rock 

Kent State 30 Cedarville 

Kent State 35 Slippery Rock.. . . 

Kent State 23 Akron University 

Kent State 27 Indiana Normal . . 



.57 at Alliance 

17 at Kent 

35 at Kent 

37 at Kent 

24 at Indiana, Pa. 

68 at Kent 

44 at Cleveland 

30 at Kent 

24 at Cedarville 

40 at Columbus 

31 at Wilmington 

28 at Kent 

20 at Kent 

37 at Slippery Rock 

21 at Kent 

30 at Kent 



['(ii/i: niic hundred seventy-six 



THE 



ASKETBALL SEASON 



The 1926-27 Basketball season was the most successful one completed by a Kent 
State team for many years. Although playing one of the stiffest schedules ever 
attempted by a "Silver Fox" team, Kent managed to hold her own against the best 
in the Ohio Conference. 

The game with Aicron University made Kent stand out better than any other. 
The Zippers who were leading the Ohio Conference came to Kent expecting an easy 
game — but Kent State was set for them and downed Akron 23-21 in the best game 
ever staged in Wills Gymnasium. Every player who participated in the game was 
responsible for the victory. Other Ohio Conference teams Kent played were Mount 
Union, Case, Baldwin-Wallace, Hiram, and Kenyon. 

Of the seven men who won letters this year only one, Gus Peterka, who has played 
four years of basketball for Kent State is lost through graduation. The prospects 
of a winning team next year are very favorable, as McDermott, Vair, Curtiss, Graber, 
Searle, DeLeone, Whyte, and Henly will be back besides a wealth of material from the 
Freshman Class. 



Player Position 

Curtiss Guard . . 

DeLeone Guard . . 

Vair Forward 

McDermott Forward 

Searle Center . 

Peterka Center . 

Graber Guard . . 

Rogers Center . 

Henley Forward 

Feeley Guard . . 





Field 


Foul 




Games 


Goals 


Goals 


Points 


16 


32 


21 


85 


16 


24 


18 


66 


15 


25 


9 


59 


12 


20 


8 


48 


12 


12 


10 


34 


13 


14 


5 


33 


16 


2 


5 


9 


5 


1 


1 


3 


5 





2 


2 


2 





1 


1 



Page one hundred seventy-seven 



11 




BASEBALL SQUAD — 1926 

CuRTiss, Graber, Mowery, Evans, Hallihan 

Wagoner, Coach; Hershberger, Miller, Byrne, Arnold, Polen, Baldwin, Spangler. 

Elden Youngen, Captain Pitcher 

Raymond Glass Pitcher 

Charles Arnold Catcher 

Harold Polen Catcher 

William Hallehan First Base 

August Peterka First Base 

Howard Evans Second Base 

Carl Baldwin Second Base 

Paul Hershberger Third Base 

Joseph DeLeone Third Base 

Ralph Byrne Short Stop 

Earl Miller Short Stop 

Claude Graber Outfield 

Prank Curtiss Outfield 

Oliver Mowery Outfield 

Merle E. Wagoner Coach 

Charles E. Spangler Manager 



Paye one hundred seve>iti/-eight 



BASEBALL SEASON 

With the first game a 3-1 victory over Ashland, the 1926 baseball team started 
the season with a bang. The boys displayed an ability to hit as well as to field. After 
copping the first game, Wagoner's men met Baldwin-Wallace before a large home- 
coming crowd, and by last inning rallies nosed out B-W, 5-4 in ten innings. Hallahan's 
single, with two men on base, gave Kent its second straight win. Much credit was 
due to Captain Youngen's splendid pitching. In the next game Kent walloped Thiel 
16-2 in an uninteresting game. The trip to Slippery Rock gave Kent her fourth 
straight victory. Glass was in rare form and gave Slippery a few scattered hits. 
The final score was 11-7 in favor of Kent. The next day Coach Wagoner and his men 
traveled to Ashland to play a return game. The team went on a hitting spree to 
capture the fifth straight win of the season, 5-4. This ended the season and Kent, 
for the first time, had come through a season unbeaten. 

The 1927 season is barely under way as this is written, so it is difficult to say what 
to expect. Practice started late in March. The letter men to report were: Graber. 
Feeley, Polen, and Curtiss. Besides these men McDermott, DeLeone, Williamson, 
Miller, and several others are out for the squad. 
The schedule for 1927— 

April 28 Western Reserve at Kent. 

May 5 Western Reserve at Cleveland. 

May 7 Ashland at Ashland. 

May 14 Slippery Rock at Kent. 

May 17 Baldwin-Wallace at Kent. 

May 24 Ashland at Kent. 

May 26 Slippery Rock at Slippery Rock. 

June 3 Akron at Kent. 



Page one hundred sei'enty-ni/ie 



% 

4 




THE 1926 TENNIS SEASON 

Top row, left to right: Deakins, Dunn, Smith, Coach, Wagoner. 
Bottom row: Jacobs, Line, Brown. 

The 1926 tennis season was the most successful in several years. Although 
she did not win many matches, Kent State always gave her opponents a hard fight. 
Jacobs was the only squad member to win all his matches, and his playing was 
never off form. 

At the close of the season letters were awarded to Deakins, Smith, Jacobs, Line, 
and Brown. 

Because of a recent ruling made by the Athletic Board, there will be no tennis 
team on the campus this year. 



RECORD, 1926 



Kent State 6 

Kent State 2 

Kent State 1 

Kent State 6 

Kent State 2 

Kent State 2 



Spencerians 

Hiram 4 

Capitol U 5 

Spencerians 

Slippery Rock 3 

Hiram 4 



Page one liKudyed eic/htii 




STATE HIGH 



L U E D E \' I L S 



Warner, Manager, Kilbourne, McHenry, Ludick, Francis, Coach, Harsh, 
Faculty Manager. 

Ve Nard, Van Deusen, C. Johnson, Captain, Mercer, Manes. 

Kent State High ended a very successful Basketball year by winning the State 
Class "B" Championship, Mai'ch eighteenth and nineteenth at Columbus, Ohio. They 
started their successful season by winning a first place in the Trolley League, then 
they entered the State Sectional Tournament held in Wills Gymnasium; they came 
through this on top, winning by wide margins. This victory gave the "Blue Devils" 
the right to enter the State District Tournament held in the Goodyear Gymnasium, 
Akron, Ohio. A first place in this tourney gave them a ticket to Columbus to enter 
the State Class "B" Tournament held in the Coliseum. Here they met real opposition 
but were not stopped. They won three games in great style, defeating Oberlin High, 
last year's State Champion. 

"Our Champs" played a total of twenty-one games this year and lost four. They 
will lose three of the eight men but still have five left for the coming season. From 
this it is judged that next season should be as successful as this. 

State High School proudly possesses four first place trophies won by the team, and 
one, won by the school itself, knovra as the "Sportsmanship Cup." 



Page one hundred eighty-one 




Jlshlcnd 




Lneef A^ecx/e/- 



Ll 



Page one hundred eiffhty-twq 









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Pac/e one hundred eighty-three 



':o). 



OWED TO POVERTY 

Tuition, hats, and railroad fare, 
And board and room, and slices, 
Allowances and spiffy ties, 
,, V ' And evening clothes, and dues, 

( •,, I tell you it's no joke, 

,.j And slickers, books and fountain pens. 

1 ^ ; V To see a way for four whole years 

',';-) ,' . At college when you're broke. 

Of course there are some lucky guys 

Who have a lot of cash, 

And know that when they get to school 

They'll make an awful splash. 

To them it is a cinch to spend 

A thousand at one stroke 

They don't know what it is to go 

To college when you're broke. 

They tell me that a rich man's son 
Is seldom a success. 
Ax that rate I will some day have 
A million, more or less. 
So poor men's sons let us no more 
Bewail our bitter yoke — 
, We're better off to have to go 

To college when we're broke. 



First Occupant of Booth (looking at the key dangling from the other's chain): 
"Pi Delta Epsilon or Pe Gamma Mu?" 

Waitress: "Say where do yuh think yu are? You'll either have your pie a la 
mode or just plain pie." 



F — ierce lessons 

L — ate hours 

U — nsuspected companjr 

N — othing prepared 

K — illed in test. 



"What time does your next class start?' 
"Half an hour ago." 



Life is real, life is earnest 

We must strive to do our best. 

And departing leave behind us 

Notebooks that will help the rest. 



'Are you going out for track?" 

'No, we're still having indoor practice." 



Page one hundred eighty-fmir 




Page one hundred eighty-five 






I 

I TO OUR READERS 

I In closing the editorial section of the ]927 

I Chestnut Burr, the editor wishes to make grate- 

) ful acknowledgement to those in general who have 

I made the compilation of this book possible. To 

I the Chestnut Burr Board the editor wishes to 

I express a public appreciation for a splendid type 

[ of co-operation, to the staff, the editor wishes to 

1 state a parting word of thanks for their persistent 

j aid thruout the year; to the readers, the editor 

j wishes to ask them to allow the 1927 Chestnut 

I Burr, its predecessors and its successors, to inspire 

! them to a greater loyalty for the traditions, 

I history, and achievements herein embodied. 

! Robert Fosnigut, 

I Editor 
j 



Fafje ove hnvdred eighty-six 



TO OUR ADVERTIZERS | 

The Staff of the 1927 Chestnut | 

Burr is grateful for the loyal support I 

and friendly cooperation of Kent I 

Citizens. We are wishing them I 

a happy and prosperous year, and J 

to the readers of this book we say, ! 

"Patronize our Advertisers" ! 

LuciLE Pearce, I 

I 
j 



Business Manager 



Page one hundred eighty-seven 




Payc (iiic hu}idicd eighty-eight 



KENT STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 
COURSES 

Four-year course for high school teachers. 
Four-year course for kindergarten primary teachers. 
Two-year course for lower grade teachers. 
Two-year course for upper grade teachers. 
Two-year course for rural teachers. 

SPECIAL ADVANTAGES 

Large new gymnasium with line equipment. 

Splendid swimming pool. 

Finest health department. 

A complete model school, from kindergarten to senior high. 

Pleasant rooms. 

Library of great efficiency. 

Fine auditorium, good stage and scenery. 

Active organizations. 

\\'ell equipped and trained teams, football, basketball, baseball, track. 

Two fine new buildings under construction. 

Growing faculty. 

Improved laboratories. 

High standards. 

SPECIAL CAFETERIA SERVICE DURING 
SUMMER TERM 

Summer Quarter Opens June 20 Fall Term Opens September 

For information address the President. 



Page one hundred eighty-vine. 



DRUGS CANDY 



'EVERYTHING YOU WOULD EXPECT 

in a 

MODERN 

DRUG STORE 

at 

HALE B. THOMPSONS 

Registered Pharmacist 

Corner Main and Water Street 

TELEPHONE 150. 



COLLEGE BOOKS STATIONERY 



Page one hundred ninety 



WiLBERT C. RONAN, A. I. A. R. G. INGLESON 

Consulting Architect Consulting Engineer 

Professor of Design 
Ohio State University 

RONAN & INGLESON 

ARCHITECTS & ENGINEERS 
Columbus, Ohio 



DESIGNERS 
OF 

Gymnasium 

Addition to Lowry Hall 

Connecting Corridors 

Boilers and Stokers 

Tunnels 

Swimming Pool 

New Dining Hall 

Central Heating Plant 

Teachers Training Building 

Library 



Page one hundred ninety-one 




BOOKSELLERS TO KENT STATE. 



COLLEGE BOOK STORE 



"ON EDGE OF THE CAMPUS' 



Page one hiiiidi-ed iiiHeti/-two 



THE CITY BANK 



KENT, OHIO 

Organized 1881 



S' 



ASSETS OVER 51,000,000 
Safety Deposit Boxes for Rent 



S' 



4 PER CENT ON TIME DEPOSITS'. 



S' 



OFFICERS 

H. H. Line Chairman of Board 

M. G. Garrison President 

D. L. Rockwell Vice President 

E. F. Garrison Secretary-Treasurer 

G. F. Bechtle Assistant Treasurer 



Page one hundred ninety-three 



Modernizing Electric 
Interurban Service — 



m 




Parlor chair cars are now in operation between Canton, Akron and 
Cleveland. 

This provides a de luxe service that we trust will appeal to all students 
going to Cleveland or Canton. 
These cars are obtainable at Silver Lake Junction. 
They provide a high grade limited service without extra fare. 
Save parking and garage worries by trying these new cars. 
YOUR COMFORT — OUR SERVICE 

Northern Ohio Power and Light Company. 



Page one hundred ninety-four 



Service 



Means getting what you want when you 
want it at a reasonable price. 

We Have Everything That a 
Student Wants. 

Headquarters for Books 

both new and used. 

Fountain Pens and Pencils, 
College Pennants and Cushion Tops. 
Ocean Bathing Tank Suits and Caps, 
Spalding Gym Suits and Shoes, 
Complete Line of Notebooks and Fillers, 
Complete Line of College Stationery. 
A College Store Run by College 
Students. 



Rivals thi bzauty of tite Scarl&t Tanager 

Come Here for your 

Non-Breakable 

Parker Duo£oId 

Pencils to match 

^3,^3.50 and $4 

Duofolds, and the new 

Parker Pens in Pastel 

Shades. Pencils to match. 



COLLEGE EXCHANGE 






PARKER PEN HEADQU/S RTERS 

r"^?»;^ 



Kent "Barbecue 

"Boettler's Field 
M. Mdntud Rodd 

VJe Cater to Kent Normal 
Students 

Qudliti] dnd Seruice 
neuer chdnge 



Page one hundred ni7iety-five 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

V. W. SURBER 

AKRON, OHIO. 



GENERAL CONTRACTOR 
on 

Wills Gymnasium 
Addition to Lowry Hall 
New Training School 
Swimming Pool 

KENT STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 



BARR & SKINNER 

Phone, Main 6715 
Office, 109 N. Union St. 

Akron, Ohio 



Lathing, Plastering, Stucco, 
and Ornamental 

J. R. BARR JOHN H. SKINNER 

586 Patterson Ave. 948 Mercer St. 

Portage 225— R Portage 763— W 



Pa(jc one hundri'd ninty-si.x 



AKRON LAW SCHOOL 

57 East Market Street 
AKRON, OHIO 



Offers a four-year evening course preparing for bar 
examination and leading to the degree of LL. B. 



Students with one year of college training are eligible to register 
for the fall class. After October 15, 1927, two years of college training 
will be required at the time of registration. 

Ask for catalog. 

C. A. Nkale, Pics. 



KENT NATIONAL 
BANK 

Checking accounts solicited 

4% Paid on savings 

Safety Deposit Boxes for Rent 

4°l- & Safety 




The Gruen Prestige Ci)f!ts No More. 

The Name on the Watch Dial 

is All— Important— Gi?L'£'N 




G. F. ELGIN 

Jewele)- and Ovtometrist 
141 N. Water St. 



Page ove hundred ninety-seven 



> 

% 



DONAGHY'S 



THE 



Friendly Drug Store 



A drug store founded and operated on the somewhat 

unusual and unique principle that Friendship 

is paramount to financial gain. 



WHERE YOU WILL FIND 
Text Books, Students supplies, Sheaffer Lifetime Pens, Domestic and Imported 
Toiletries, Stationery, Delicious Luncheon and Soda, Kodaks, Films and finishing, 
and friendly, interested sales people. 



OLIN'S 


HOWARD YOUNG 


QUALITY MUSIC STORE 


Bicycles, Sporting Goods 


Established 1880 


Fishing Tackle 




Auto Accessories 


MUSICAL MERCHANDISE 


Tires 


Latest in Sheet Music 




and Records 


(^ 


Phone 32 




135 East Main Street 
KENT, OHIO. 


Phone 44 143 E. Main St. 
KENT, OHIO. 



.I'cif/e one hundred ninety-eight 



STEINER'S BOOK STORE 

"The Students Store" 

College Supplies 

Stationery 

Books 

Gifts 

Greeting Cards 

Dennison Goods 

Kodak Finishing 



PHONE 445 



141 E. MAIN ST. 



E. R. STEINER 



O 



M 



I 
M 
E 

N 
of T 



RICHARDS 

FLOWER 



SHOP 



Compliments 



of 



COZY CORNER 



Kent State Students 
patronize us. 
We patronize 

Kent State Students. 



Page one Imndred ninety-nine 



LONGCOY'S BARBECUE 






Barbecue Sandwiches 

Toasted Sandwiches 

Coffee 

Pie 

Soft Drinks 

Ice Cream 

Cocoa 

Cigars - Cigarettes - Candy 



East of the College 
on the hill. 



Orders delivered 
to dormitories. 



Complete Line 


Est. 1910 Leo A. Bietz, Mgr. 


of 
Men's Furnishings 

Hats, Caps, Neckwear, Shirts, 
Underwear, Hosiery. 


IMPERIAL 
Dry Cleaning Co. 

Phone 452 


Largest assortment of Pipes, 




and Tobacco. 




m 


^ 


FRED BECHTLE 


Kent National 113 N. Water St. 


132 S. Water St. 


Bank Bldg. Kent, Ohio. 



Page two hundred 



THE 



KNEIFEL 


KENT COURIER 


GROCERY CO. 


Lawson and Arthurs 


Phones 42 & 43 


Proprietors 


KENT, OHIO 






Printers-Publishers 


Give ns a Trial 


138 E. Main St. 




Phone 26 Kent, Ohio. 



GENSEMER BROS. 

KENT, OHIO. 




Retailers of 

Dry Goods Floor Coverings 

Ladies' and Children's Footwear 

Ladies' Ready-Made Garments 



Page tivo hundred one 



DAVET TREE SURGEONS 

FOR SAFE TREE SURGERY 



5 




Indoor Forest of The Davey Institute of 
Tree Surgery, where the Science of Tree 
Surgery is taught in actual practice. No 
experimenting is done on the clients' trees. 

THE DAVEY TREE EXPERT CO., INC., 295 City Bank Bldg., Kent, Ohio 



GIBSON and OTT 


What a Happy 


Restaurant 


Thought! 




To know of a real place to buy 




Sporting Goods. 


.._•;;';■ 


_. To know that the prices are 


■'<"'- 


always right. 




To know that you will receive 




prompt and efficient service. 


Cor. Main and Franklin 


To know that we have Kent State 


Phone 124 


Normal in our hearts. 




To know that this store is 




The M. S. LONG Co. 




Sporting Goods 




147 S. Main St., Akron, Ohio. 


Kent, Ohio. 


"Coach" Geo. B. Kirk, Mgr. 



Page two hundred two- 




THE NATIONAL BLANK 
BOOK & SUPPLY CO. 

36 North Main St. 
Akron, Ohio. 

Office Supplies, Safes, Letter Files, 
Steel Shelving. 



ACTUAL 

Offers Complete Courses in 
all Business Subjects. 

General Business 

Secretarial 

Auditing 

Accounting 

Stenography 

Bookkeeping 

DAY AND NIGHT CLASSES 

Write or telephone for 

complete information 

ACTUAL BUSINESS 
COLLEGE 

21 N. Main St. Main 197 

Akron, Ohio. 




Tires, Tubes, Batteries, 
Accessories, 
Gas and Oil 

IDEAL TIRE SHOP 

313 N. Water St. Phone 196. 
Kent, Ohio. 



READ STUDIO 

Yes, we made the pictures and we 
have your negatives on file. Any 
time you wish prints from them, we 
can make them for you on short no- 
tice. See the enlargements from these 
films, they are certainly fine. 

IVe Specialise On 
Kodak Work 

129 E. Main Street 
Kent, Ohio. 



Page two hundred ihree 




'^AHN & OLLIER AGAIN" 



FINE annuals, like brilliant victories, are brought about by the co-or- 
dination of skillful generalship and trained effort. The Jahn & Oilier 
Engraving Co. is America's foremost school annual designing and engraving 
specialist, because in its organization are mobilized America's leading cre- 
ati\"e minds and mechanical craftsmen. 

THE JAHN & OLLIER ENGRAVING CO. 

Photographers] Artists and Makers of Fine Printing Plates for Black and Colors 
817 W. Washington Blvd., Chicago 



iM^ 



Page two Iiinidrcd four 




Page two hundred five 



h